Is Hasbro's size an inhibition to it's ability to market it's own products ?

Discussion in 'Transformers Toy Discussion' started by RedAlert Rescue, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. RedAlert Rescue

    RedAlert Rescue Banned

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    RE : Is Hasbro's size an inhibition to it's ability to market it's own products ?

    I was thinking someone develops a product like Transformers or one of the cardbased game properties and the people who develop it probably have some understanding of the brand that seems to end at the design team and the brand manager, then you take that down a step to the marketing and sale department and some of that knowledge seems to start to bleed away you get poor print adverts and to many to count official images with mistransformed toys (Robots in Disguise 'leader' Ultra Magnus anyone).

    I also read that they no longer do their own art or of the some product development any more they farm it out to outside companies, this has always been done that Hasbro have used outside people with developing a product (Cowboys of Moo Messa for example). But it seems that great chunks of this are now given to outsiders Kreo is essentially designed by an outside building brick specialist company and not buy Hasbro to any great extent. they have less to do with it that they do regular Transformers for example.

    I'm wondering if at every stage of production Hasbro becomes increasingly removed from an understanding of it's own brand and how to sell it is this contributing to the large numbers of missteps of late and also to their seeming inability to get big retailers to buy their products in a meaningful time table.

    It seems that this leach of expertise or a lack of understanding of their own products is actually harming their sales at all points.

    Even Takara seem to be admitting to a certain confusion as to what way to handle their own take on the Transformers brand.

    I just notice that when ever Hasbro buys a smaller company principally to gain it's I.P. they usually manage to fail to make any long term money off that brand and it usually nose dives soon afterwards as with Galoob or Microprose. I'm thinking of say Micromachines as an example of that.

    In simple terms are Hasbro acting a bit thick lately?
     
  2. Aernaroth

    Aernaroth <b><font color=blue>I voted for Super_Megatron and Veteran

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    If Hasbro is ineffective in it's ability to market it's own products, it would be due to how the company is arranged, not it's size.

    If what you're insinuating is true, it would be more advantageous for Hasbro to reorganize itself into more focused in-house marketing services and to use the massive resources of a multinational corporation to thrive, than it would be to try and act as a smaller company would.
     
  3. Big Dawg

    Big Dawg Well-Known Member

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    they seem to be taking the opposite route of Marvel- Marvel had success in films and now brings them in-house for development, expands digital media brands, more toys under the marvel banner etc. Hasbro on the other hand has a successful film and they use it to boost their bottom line numbers to share holders (obvious from the 1st Q reports this year as opposed to last year with DOTM) and are increasingly decentralizing their big brands. strange.
     
  4. RedAlert Rescue

    RedAlert Rescue Banned

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    It just seems that there's a disconnect somewhere along the line the interest in what they are selling seems to evaporate.

    Take for example how they sell their cartoon licenses off to some media company but take no interest in it after that - Heck they should be watching it like a hawk - if their shows are placed on the wrong channel in the wrong market at the wrong time their toy sales will be nonexistant in that market with nothing to act as a principle means of marketing them.

    For example Beast Machines was not on TV in the UK when the toys were out so no one was ordering the toys with out a TV show to back it the 1st wave killed the line dead as they got lumbered with a 2 figure wave that had loads of a substandard Optimus Primal toy in it.

    They failed in all respects then. and Beast Machines was effectively a write off.

    To use a similar USA example - they had a gap of more than a year before any Animated or Prime toys made it to shelves.

    Surely it's worth the risk of a single wave at least times closer to the release of the shows ?

    You wouldn't expect Movie toys to be a year later would you - and it didn't take Bandai a year to finally get it's backside in gear and release some Thundercats toys,, and they had enough of a delay on them too.

    If Prime took a year to develop and the toys take 7 Monthsplus a little longer for any additional testing they need to do now for the new toy regs then why not a joint launch

    Or at least a launch as soon as the DOTM line had died ?

    Why was their even 2 different toylines - why did they lack the confidence in their own products to find a way to sell the FE one convincingly in all markets - they spent all the money inventing the toys then they don't use the moulds for most of the world markets at all.


    Now I know you can't blame them for everything.. but I do worry that there's a real lack of care - I think they need to give the brands a better baby sitters across all areas ; or have some decent strategies.

    Now I don't want some muppet sticking his foot in like during Beast Machine and making a pest of themselves - but I would like to see a strategy that did the best it could for it's brand development and maintainance for it's shareholders.

    Even something as simple of making sure that deals are done to insure that their TV shows get a DVD/Bluray release in as many markets as possible for example.

    Transformers Animated never did get that consideration and I can only point to that being a contributing factor to it falling flat on it's face in many markets outside North America.

    I wont get started on the whole Movie thing to much but it does seem a bit odd that it was high up in Dreamworks and elsewhere who lobbied for the Decepticons to speak and Hasbro didn't even seem to care if the Decepticons were voiceless monsters in the 2007 Movie as was originally intended. or even seem to raise an eyebrow that there was jokes made that are so unsuitable for a child audience (to many to mention really - but I'd use Sam's happy time as the obvious one) that sort of stuff used to be in 15 rated movies not PG ones.

    Transformers is a brand aimed at 7 year olds but I'm not sure i'm comfortable with a 7 year old watching that movie series - it's just to smutty. (Smuttier than Movies like Ghostbusters and Evolution are) and those are the template Movies for Transformers so I hear.
     
  5. Aernaroth

    Aernaroth <b><font color=blue>I voted for Super_Megatron and Veteran

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    I remember a few years ago during a press release they basically stated that they'd found it was more profitable to be a brand licenser and creator than to be a brand developer, and that's the direction they'd be moving the company towards from then on.

    That's probably what we're seeing now. Having someone else do the work to elevate awareness of your brand and pay you for the trouble is a pretty sweet deal, when you think about it.
     

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