In need of some camera help

Discussion in 'Transformers Toy Discussion' started by LoC Soundwave, Oct 14, 2008.

  1. LoC Soundwave

    LoC Soundwave 俺の魂は燃えていない!

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Posts:
    2,044
    News Credits:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    212
    Likes:
    +26
    Right, so I've been trying to find solutions and tips for this for ages now, but as it has failed (or I failed depending on how you view it) I'll have to resort to asking for help here.

    I love taking pics of my toys and I'm constantly amased by all the super clear photos here on the site. I'd love to come even close to the quality of those, but I can't get the focus to...well... focus on the whole thing.

    I own a Casio Exilim Ex-z1080. And I can't find a way to increase focus depth (which I'm guessing is what I need to do?) I've been reading through the manual without finding anything there either.

    For example I have Stealth Bumblebee in front of me, pointing his gun in front of him with his arm stretched out, and the other behind him. I want to have the whole figure in focus, but the gun and anything far enough behind him keeps getting blurry and out of focus.

    I've also tried using different "Best Shot" modes and messing around with the settings to try and improve without luck.

    Any hints are very well welcomed :) 
     
  2. Joe Moore

    Joe Moore Is Not Jim... Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2003
    Posts:
    14,471
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    262
    Likes:
    +7
    Ebay:
    Twitter:
    For a shot like that, set the camera further back and zoom in a bit. This will cause the camera to focus on the whole figure as opposed to just the gun. Don't zoom in too close, and adjust your focus so that the figure is nice and crisp. After taking the photo, you may want to crop in a bit to better frame the image.
     
  3. Skywave

    Skywave Transformers Noob

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Posts:
    1,375
    Trophy Points:
    141
    Likes:
    +0
    I never use zoom when I take pics of toys personally. I use the mode for close object, wich is "flower mode" for object at 70cm or closer on my cam. Then I just center the pics I want (don't go too close or it can get blurry), and the pic is pretty much ok all the time.

    Since the pics are so big (it's a 5-6 megapixel cam, so pics are close to 2000x2000 pixel if I remember), all I have to do is reduce the size in paint (to 30% for a good forum-size) and crop the part of the pics I want, and it's done :) 
     
  4. Joe Moore

    Joe Moore Is Not Jim... Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2003
    Posts:
    14,471
    News Credits:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    262
    Likes:
    +7
    Ebay:
    Twitter:
    Since he's looking to eliminate the depth of field, it's best to not use the macro mode and to zoom in from further away. This will allow for the "pointing" type pic he wants without blurring the details of the rest of the figure. If all he's looking for is "detail" static shots, then the macro mode will work well.
     
  5. Foster

    Foster Super Mod

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003
    Posts:
    32,069
    News Credits:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    312
    Likes:
    +12
    I'll move this to TF toy discussion as it's a higher-traffic area and you'll get more advice. Good question. I have a Casio Exilim myself and could use some TF shooting tips too. :) 

    All I've used in the past is the macro mode for toys.
     
  6. LoC Soundwave

    LoC Soundwave 俺の魂は燃えていない!

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Posts:
    2,044
    News Credits:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    212
    Likes:
    +26
    Thanks for the tips :)  I'll try them out when I get back from work this evening!
     
  7. Th0r4z1n3

    Th0r4z1n3 The F*cking Lizard King! Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2006
    Posts:
    4,054
    News Credits:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    161
    Likes:
    +9
    When I'm trying to get the whole figure in focus rather than just one part (lets say the gun pointed at the camera with everything else blurred) what I usually do is shoot wide so that the whole figure is in my focus area and then crop it down. Usually there is a box or a set of brackets in the viewfinder, the camera assumes that that is what you are trying to focus on and as something moves out of that area it becomes more out of focus.

    I've found success with that method, but by no means do I claim to be a pro photographer just a geek that likes to take pics of his TFs.

    (Using Sony Alpha A-100 btw)
     

Share This Page