Heavy/Scratch: IDW Whirl Upgrade Kit

Discussion in 'Radicons Customs' started by javaco, Mar 17, 2014.

  1. Llama G0d

    Llama G0d Six-winged god of llamas

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    Aye, likewise. Want to see if it'll cut down on painting. (Because I suck at painting. ;-) )
     
  2. Soundbarricade

    Soundbarricade Furmanism

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    I thought about the painting part too, but I think the blue is too dark. Whirl in the comics is a light blue/gray, if my memory serves, but I have never seen Shapeways blue :p 
    (And by the way, I think half the fun of these kits is the painting!)
    I have read a lot about painting up Shapeways plastic, and it is important to soak the pieces in 50/50 warm water and dishwasher soap for three hours, preferably overnight! That's gonna be hard waiting that long ;-)

    UPDATE:
    As Blurrz has pointed out, WSF doesn't need to be soaked in water! I don't know if it can damage the material, but it isn't necessary.
    You can wash the pieces with warm water and dishwasher soap, and gently brush them with an old toothbrush, to get all the extra "dust" off, before painting, to my understanding, atleast :) 
     
  3. The Diggs

    The Diggs Mad Scientist

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    I will certainly post pics when I get the chance (though it'll be a few weeks before I'm ready to work on it).

    I know the blue is probably too dark for his main color, but it might work for his darker blue accents (claws, etc.)

    I never heard of the soaking trick---why is it you need to do that before painting, Soundbarricade?
     
  4. Soundbarricade

    Soundbarricade Furmanism

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    I was reading a lot about painting tips, but I finally found the page where it explains it: https://www.shapeways.com/blog/archives/22021-tips-n-tricks-for-painting-miniatures.html
    I'm not sure what type of material this guy is using, or how big a difference there is between the materials Shapeways offer, but better safe, and all that ;-)

    I also just got a shipping notice for my set yesterday! Shapeways is in the Netherlands...? Whaaa'...?
     
  5. Blurrz

    Blurrz J├Ągermeister Sensei

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    The user in that guide is using frosted ultra detail, which evident from the price tag, is a more superior material that doesn't really require any further patch work.

    Strong and flexible is a sturdy and solid material, but the first thing you're going to notice is that the material is very grainy. I do recommend a thorough sanding, but please note it's never going to be perfectly smooth. I'm not entirely sure about putting the material in water, as I think the last thing you'd want to do is for the material to expand further (i'll get into that later)

    I do recommend giving the material a nice coat of black paint (or whatever base you prefer) before you add on anything else, as this helps give the material a base to work with.

    Please note that this kit is not for the faint of heart and you're going to have to spend a good chunk of time prepping the material and setting up the figure before even getting to paint everything. There's pin pushing and all that which requires alot of patience, and make sure you don't cut yourself either with any of the sharp parts.

    I'd also like to note that you're likely going to run into issues with alot of the parts not fitting snuggly into the ball joints, mostly at the feet (between shapeways material + shapeways material), and the claws/hands (shapeways material + shapeways material). This can be fixed easily by applying a small amount of super glue where the ball joints are located to add some friction. (Let the super glue dry on the ball joints for a few hours or else you're.. I shouldn't really need to explain this :p )

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Soundbarricade

    Soundbarricade Furmanism

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    First, let me just wipe up all my drool...
    But yeah, thanks for the info! It was exactly these kind of tricks I was looking for! And, as I have mentioned before, I have never had Shapeways items in-hand, so the more I know before going in, the better!
    The whole prepping, pin-removal and painting thing, is one of my favourite hobbies, so no problem there^^
    I have a watchmakers education (not sure how to say that properly, English is my second language :-/ ) so I have a lot of tools and know-how... And it gives me something in common with Whirl. That, and my big claws ;-)
     
  7. Soundbarricade

    Soundbarricade Furmanism

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    According to Shapeways track and trace, I should have my Whirl kit tomorrow, so I have taken the Tomahawk I got in the mail a couple of days ago, apart:
    [​IMG]

    As has been mentioned, it is NOT easy! i mannaged without breaking anything, and I have taken a lot of pictures, so if anyone is interested in a disassembly tutorial, I will happily post ^^
     

    Attached Files:

  8. KowBot

    KowBot Well-Known Member

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    Please post a tutorial! I need the help esp with the pins.
     
  9. Soundbarricade

    Soundbarricade Furmanism

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    The first thing I did, was to unscrew the arms. There is one screw in each arm, and they come apart in three pieces, pretty straight forward. That way, they aren't in the way. Then I removed the two screws in the main body:

    [​IMG]

    The grey part is what is left of the arm. Apparently it is pinned on, from the inside :-/
    It took me a lot of time to get the main body split apart! I do NOT recommend doing it. It turned out, that the back part is not just glued together...

    [​IMG]

    There is a pin inside the damned thing!

    [​IMG]

    Also, the grey part the legs are connected to, the part that swings down, is pinned twice from the outside:

    [​IMG]

    I looked at it as I was moving it up and down, and noticed that the pin wasn't moving with the grey part, which meant that I would be able to "gently" wrestle it apart with a screwdriver.

    After finally getting the back apart (considering something i can put in the hole left by the propeller, to hold the sword on his back...)
    I was able to remove the cockpit. This picture shows the way the pin was inserted (on mine at least, I don't know if it can vary):

    [​IMG]

    The best way to remove a pin, is to make sure that you support the bottom of the piece as close to the pin as possible!
    I have made a crude illustration, behold my Paint skillz!

    [​IMG]

    I hope that made sense...
    After removing the pin, I split the cockpit. There appear to have been some glue in the front, but it didn't give me any trouble, but be aware:

    [​IMG]

    These are the pieces in the cockpit:

    [​IMG]

    When all is taken apart, these are the pieces you end up using with the Whirl set:

    [​IMG]

    My Shapeways order came in today! sadly I won't be able to make too much of it, since I have a Deadpool cosplay that need to be done by the end of the month :-/

    If I missed anything, please ask! I took most of the pics in the process, yesterday, and I think there may have been a couple of things i forgot...
     

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  10. Hotpiece

    Hotpiece Blazechaser

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    Thank you for the tutorial! Correct me if I'm wrong, but if you didn't want to add the chest guns, do you still have to split the main body? It looks like the world's biggest pain in the butt.
     
  11. EnergonWaffles

    EnergonWaffles Autobot's Head Chef Moderator

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    That is....beautiful...
     
  12. figureguy

    figureguy Well-Known Member

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    Could someone post the link to the kit on Shapeways? I would appreciate it. Thanks.
     
  13. Soundbarricade

    Soundbarricade Furmanism

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  14. Soundbarricade

    Soundbarricade Furmanism

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    I can't check for sure, but sadly, I do think you have to atleast pry it apart a lot. You have to split the body to split the cockpit, and you have to do that so you can replace the head :-/ splitting the back carefully also makes it easier (I think) to remove the propleller without breaking it, not that that is important...
    There is a great assembly instruction on page 23, where you can see the head instalation. to me it looks like replacing the head means that you can easily add the chest guns, once you're at that part
     
  15. Soundbarricade

    Soundbarricade Furmanism

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    To all who might want to give this set a try, I think the best thing to do, is get the Tomahawk mold in hand first, and trying to take it apart.
    It would suck spending a lot of money on both the figure and the Shapeways kit, and then accidentally breaking the figure and giving up :-/

    I think i am going to re-assemble my Tomahawk figure, and take some more pictures of the entire disassembly process, just to make it all a little clearer, not completely happy with my previous tutorial...
     
  16. Hotpiece

    Hotpiece Blazechaser

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    I am not looking forward to splitting that body, but the custom isn't worth doing if it doesn't have the Whirl head so I guess I don't have a choice. Too bad the Headrobots Drone head isn't IDW enough.
     
  17. Blurrz

    Blurrz J├Ągermeister Sensei

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    IIRC the main body also has to be split so the new head/neck gets to be put in.
     
  18. Starganderfish

    Starganderfish Well-Known Member

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    I picked up a Tomahawk figure from ebay and it arrived this morning. Definitely agree it's not the easiest kit to take apart but it's not TOO bad so far. At least a lot of the joins are held together with screws rather than pins. Compared to an MP, this should be a breeze!! (Plus if I break it a replacement is only $15-20 rather than the $100+ for a new MP.)

    I snapped one or two plastic nubs in the arms separating them but nothing that can't be easily glued back together. Arms and legs etc are pretty easy.

    Unfortunately mine was a 2nd hand figure so some of the screws are a bit rusty/degraded. Having a lot of trouble removing the two screws from the main body - Dropped some WD40 in at the moment and hoping that will loosen things. Otherwise I may have to drill those two out, though I may try the soldering iron trick first.

    Really looking forward to getting this properly underway. Just ordered the Shapeways kit in WSF Polished. Last couple of kits I ordered in polished were far from smooth. Even with careful sanding and several layers of paint, they're pretty grainy. This kit looks like it has smoother parts without as much surface detail so fingers cross it will work better.
    Update: Did some reading and found a link on Shapeways: https://www.shapeways.com/forum/index.php?t=msg&goto=93880
    This guy recommends using something called: "Mr Hobby Mr Dissolved Putty" It's basically a very thin putty/filler that you lightly paint on to the surface with a brush, allow to dry and then sand back. I've ordered a jar off ebay and will see how it works to fill in the graininess of the Shapeways plastic.
     
  19. Starganderfish

    Starganderfish Well-Known Member

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    Alright, that turned out to be a lot less painful than I thought. Some WD40 on the rusted screws for an hour, then I got a very small, very sharp flat head screwdriver and basically jammed it into the top of the rusty screws, creating a new groove. They screwed right out.

    Then a soldering iron on the two big pins connecting the legs to the main canopy and they basically just slid apart.

    The hardest part was un-pinning the canopy. The image from Soundbarricade (attached) was exactly right regarding which end of the pin was rough. The hard part was hammering this out without destroying the clear canopy. I was able to inch it out far enough on one side that it was no longer gripping the clear part, then I very carefully angled the clear canopy off on it's own. Then it was easy to pull the pin out and disassemble. Levered the main body a little with a very fine metal "spatula" tool I have and it kind of just popped apart in my hands!
    I used a spring loaded pin punch to get the pins moving then a small nail and gentle hammer taps to keep it going as my pin punch is way too thick!.

    One awesome tip I picked up from other customisers on the forum is to use Sclupey or a similar dense clay like material to rest the part on while un-pinning, rather than wood blocks or the table. The clay is dense enough to provide decent support for the part but lacks the hard surface of wood that cracks or breaks the pieces. It's a brilliant idea and if you buy the right "oven-harden" only sculpting material it won't dry out and go hard so you can keep using it for ages.

    Now I just need to wash the parts, start priming and painting while I wait for the Shapeways kit to arrive.
     

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  20. Soundbarricade

    Soundbarricade Furmanism

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    Glad I could help^^
    Looking forward to seeing how it turns out!
    I would like to hear more about how you prime and paint (preferably with pictures) so I can get as many great tips before I start on mine.
     

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