I have decided to buy a bicycle, need help.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Synical, Jun 11, 2008.

  1. Synical

    Synical Well-Known Member

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    Ok, I haven't ridden a bike in 10 years and knew little about them then. I don't like paying for gas and I need the exercise, so seems a bike is the way to go.

    However, I don't know about the basics that I need for a decent travel bike, and I'm also short (5'7") with kinda short legs, so it may be kinda hard to find the right bike for me. If anyone has any suggestions about what I need to look for, where to go, or even specific bikes they think would work well for me, please help me out. I don't have much money and was hoping to get something decent for no more than $300.00.
     
  2. Chaos Muffin

    Chaos Muffin Misadventure Veteran

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    Get a Cannondale, or for street, get a Scorpio IMO
     
  3. CdnShockwave

    CdnShockwave The Prince of Poses TFW2005 Supporter

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    Bikes come in every shape and size you can imagine. It all really depends on where you live and the conditions you'll be riding in. For example, here in Calgary there's a doctor down the street from me who rides his bike year-round to work, so he's got a mountain bike with thick and tyres with extreme gripular capacity (probably studded tyres for the winter with the snow and ice). I've got a roadbike with perfectly smooth tyres, so any snow or ice (and even rain sometimes) means that it's more of a seasonal bike, limited to warm, dry conditions.

    If you live in an area that gets any degree of snow, I'd recommend something closer to a mountain bike style. But if you live in, say, Florida, a road bike would work well. The main difference is that the mountain bike end of the spectrum will take you through mud, dirt, snow, and all that, but they're heavier and the grooves in the tyres mean they're a little slow. A roadbike is light and designed for paved roads and for speed. Think of a mountain bike as a tank, hummer, or SUV whereas a roadbike is a lamborgini or a porsche. Of course, there a hundreds of bikes in between, so chances are there's something exactly what you're looking for. Although, roadbikes tend to be more expensive in my experience (my road bike was $2000). I'd go to a bike shop (not Wal-Mart or anything) and ask them about it. They're the professionals and will be able to help you find exactly what you're looking for within your price range.

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. Synical

    Synical Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the help, I appreciate it. I live in Indiana and have no intention of riding during the winter. I'll be doing mostly road and perhaps a bit of off road with it, and would like to be able to ride on wet pavement with no problems.

    Do bikes even have inner tubes anymore or do they use inflatable tires?
     
  5. CdnShockwave

    CdnShockwave The Prince of Poses TFW2005 Supporter

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    They have inner tubes.

    One thing I just thought of, if you're looking to get a bike without having to shell out too much, try going into a bike shop in October/November. That's the end of the season so bike shops are usually trying to clear out the old models to make way for the new year's models.
     
  6. EvaUnit13

    EvaUnit13 REBUILD

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    I can't ride a bike... :( 
     
  7. ErechOveraker

    ErechOveraker I'm with Plowking.

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    Check out Treks too, a little spendy (you get what you pay for though as the saying goes...), but light and great for riding around how you're describing, and will last for ages if you take care of it.
     
  8. AlphaPrime

    AlphaPrime Neo Autobot Commander

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    Whys that? never learned?

    I have a bike i could actually use, if i'd just you know, buy a new peddle thingy for one of the sides, messed up and messes ya up if you try and ride the thing heh.
     
  9. Aaron

    Aaron Master of Crystalocution Moderator Content Contributor

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    A bit of advice I've gotten from a big biker at work, check out pawn shops for what bikes they might have. My buddy got a 1000 dollar bike for around 150.
     
  10. ckhtiger

    ckhtiger old skool fool

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    I'm a big time biker. if you're going to be buying a used bike at all, your best bet is to get one from someone who knew what they were doing and maintained it well. it's surprisingly easy to f-up a bike, yet if you treat them right, and don't intentionally thrash it, you don't really have to touch it.

    I agree with whomever said a cannondale, although they're almost always aluminum, which is a very stiff, harsh ride. but it's also lighter, unless it's a walmart-grade bike. they do have tubless tires, but a set of wheels (have to be made for the tires) and the rubber themselves cost more than you want to spend for the whole bike. basically, you want a hybrid, which would have the upright position of a mt. bike, but tires that are a bit thinner, which allows you to roll smoother on the road. believe me, if you're going to be spending much time on the road, you DO NOT want a mt. bike, for the same reason a hummer makes a bad vehicle to commute with. pm me if you want any more advice :thumb 
     
  11. Codimus Prime

    Codimus Prime Missouri Toy Hunter

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    Go to a shop that specializes in bikes. All my major bike purchases have come from great dealers who really got to know me and what I was going to use my bike for. Plus, they usually let you ride whatever (if you're serious about buying of course).

    As for your size, there is usually a few sizes in each frame so there is something for you. It's one of those things that you'll know the correct "fit" to a bike. For me it's when I'm standing on the ground I have clearance over the cross bar (around 1 inch). Now I've been told I'm riding a bike thats "too small for my height" which is probably true. But I have shorter legs and not much in the way of standover clearance on a size up from what I'm currently riding.

    If I were you I'd look for something with front suspension only. I use to ride rigid all the time.. and ever since I got one with a front shock I know I won't go back.

    The bike I also have is built like a mountain bike for the street. Still have the wide tires but they are low rolling resistance (larger treads on the outside but smooth and groove insides). The bike also came with a riser handlebar thats bent in the middle... so I don't have to lean over as much, saves the back a little.

    I've owned a Schwinn (back before they were sold at WM) and now I have a Marin. It's a slick bike, paid right at $300 for it. Probably overpaid a little, but it was more of a gift to myself.

    Man, writing this makes me want to ride more. And I guess now that summers here and I'm fat.. probably need to get out there! Good luck on your search!
     
  12. ambushbug74

    ambushbug74 Stroke me, Stroke me! TFW2005 Supporter

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    [​IMG]
     
  13. Drake

    Drake Smooth Is Smooth Baby

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    Big Wheel FTW!! Lol! I have a 15 mile commute to work. A bike would never work for me.
     
  14. CdnShockwave

    CdnShockwave The Prince of Poses TFW2005 Supporter

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    :lolol 
     
  15. Greyryder

    Greyryder Kitbashed

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    Mountain and road bikers tend to worry too much about the height of the frame. There's a reason seat height can be adjusted. I like to have the seat on my bikes adjusted so that I'm sitting on it, with my legs straight, and my feet flat on the ground. For "proper" bike adjustment, this is considered too low. Of course, I ride a BMX, so most people consider my seat to be way too high.

    The really important measurement is the length of the top tube. If the front of the bike is too short, you'll feel really cramped riding it. "Proper" sizing and adjustment is less improtant than what feels right to you. Sit on a few bikes, and see what you like.
     
  16. Codimus Prime

    Codimus Prime Missouri Toy Hunter

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    ^^^ I know what you mean. I continue to use this setup because it feels the best for me.
     
  17. ckhtiger

    ckhtiger old skool fool

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    but seriously guys, if you have your seat down that low, you'll do damage to your knees. when you're riding, your legs should be about 80-90% extended at the bottom of the pedal stroke. that allows all of your leg muscles to do the work, and puts less strain on your knees.

    think of all the people you've seen struggling to go up a slight incline on a cheaper bike. their legs are all scrunched up because the guy at the toystore who sold them the bike because it had a cheap shock on it didn't know enough to tell them that the seat needs to be up a good height.

    it's reasons like that why you would stress over getting the right size frame. if your seat was properly adjusted, but you had a frame that was way too big, you'd be way too far off the ground. but with the right size frame, which for the op would probably be a small, you would feel just right on the bike.
     
  18. Greyryder

    Greyryder Kitbashed

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    I like to be able to stop the bike, without racking myself. I run 180mm cranks, so my leg extension is fine. I stand up to go up hills, anyway. Like I said, I ride a BMX. Most guys on 20" bikes have the seats so low, they look like they're smacking themselves in the chest with their knees.
     

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