Customs: I am about to enter custom painting waters so I have some newb questions...

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Razorclaw, Jun 16, 2010.

  1. Razorclaw

    Razorclaw Are ya gonna draw pistols

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    After some deliberation, and being ask a considerable ammount of money for a custom paint job, I have decided to custom paint my classics Starscream that has been lying idly for quite some time, as Thundercracker.

    I have noticed some people painted this figure using acrylic paint (option 1), while some have used some special dyes that they soaked the figure in (option 2).


    option 1:

    I'm interested in what do I need to do prepare the figure prior to painting it with acrylics? Do I need to clean the prior paint job? Do I have to sand all of the plastic parts down a little bit before applying the primer? What should I use for sanding these parts? Are Citadel paint good for this, or do I have to use another brand? What are the chances that the paint will rub off during transformation?


    option 2:

    Where do I have to look for the special dyes online? I can't fins such dye in my country so I will have to order from abroad? How well packed are these dyes, in what quantity do they come and what is there price?

    I'm also looking for suggestions on what blue dye would be good for Thundercracker.
     
  2. Shadowbreaker

    Shadowbreaker \/ /\

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    To prepare it, the best thing to do is disassemble it, and clean the parts with warm, soapy water. For sanding, well... I have not a clue.

    I also don't know much about paint brands besides Testors and Model Masters.

    To protect paint from rubbing off, you should prime it with..... Windex Floor Finish (With Future Shine, as it says on the bottle). AKA Future Floor Finish.

    For more and better help, you should probably check out the Tutorials section. Or wait for an experienced customizer to post their tips.

    Hope this helps! :) 
     
  3. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    As others have already said, you're better off disassembling the figure as much as you can and then soaking in dish water. As for sanding during preparation, you've got a couple of options:

    1. GoJo. This is automotive hand soap. It is the viscosity of watered sand, because that's essentially what it is. Basically, using this with a cloth or a toothbrush is the same as "wetsanding". The grit is nice because it won't leave noticeable scratches, but it will make the surface just a little rough. Don't use this on transparent plastic that you want to keep transparent though.
    2. Fine grit sandpaper and sanding parts. If you have parts that you know will rub, it's a good idea to proactively get to those parts prior to painting. Also, you can go over your whole painting surface with sandpaper just as I suggested with GoJo. Use the same precautions as I suggested with transparent plastic. Adding water while sanding to "wetsand" will give you a surface that is less scuffed than using the sandpaper only.
     
  4. OMEGAPRIME1983

    OMEGAPRIME1983 Well-Known Member

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    ^what he said. :)  Seriously though, I would disassemble the figure as far as possible. When cleaning the parts. use a mild rubbing alcohol to take the factory paint applications off. Seeing how starscream is already a gray color, I, myself, wouldn't actually worry about priming the parts. Citidel paint will work, however I suggest that you use Testors acryl's for this project. As for rubbing area's (joints, where parts meet for transformation) sand it down just a bit so that you give enough clearance for the paint to stick to the parts, but not so much that the parts will be floppy once reassembled. And most definitely put a protective clear of some sort on the figure whether it's a glossy finish or a flat one is up to you. If you decide to use a flat finished clear, testor's makes a very nice and durable enamel flat coat. And most importantly is to make sure you allow ample cure time. Some don't know this, but just because the paint is dry does not mean it is cured. How long the paint takes depends on your choice of paint, but seeing how you are going with the acrylic paints, I would allow at least 24 hours of dry before you decide to reassemble. Also, if you do use future floor polish as your clear, that will come out glossy. which is good is that's the road you end up taking. :)  Hope that helps a little.
     
  5. Razorclaw

    Razorclaw Are ya gonna draw pistols

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    First, I'd like to thank you guys for bothering to answer my questions.

    Today I started a minor project of scratch building G1 Soundwave's weapons, so I used the wet sand paper (P2000 is the code I think) to sand down the surface of the two cilinders I made. It's a strange feeling I got after going over the surface after sanding, it somewhat feels smooth, but also scoured clean at the same time.

    Right now they're in a lukewarm bath (with Fairy dishwasher) with the handles I made from greenstuff.

    This experience alone taught me that there is nothing to worry about wetsanding the parts prior to priming. I will definitely use this for Starscream.

    As for disassembling the figure, should I just yank on SS's wings or what? What about those pins? How do I take those off?
     
  6. dsn1014

    dsn1014 41:75:74:6f:62:6f:74

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  7. Razorclaw

    Razorclaw Are ya gonna draw pistols

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    Thanks for the pin removal tutorial.
     

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