How much Articulation does this Figure have?

Discussion in 'The Toyark' started by bumblebot98, Oct 23, 2009.

  1. bumblebot98

    bumblebot98 Banned

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  2. Switchblade

    Switchblade Just a raggedy man

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  3. mx-01 archon

    mx-01 archon Well-Known Member

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    That's pretty much the best version of the MK-II right there. Improvements on the articulation design even surpassing the Perfect Grade kit. Joints up the wazoo.

    And just so you know, you are aware that it's a model kit that you have to put together, right? If so, then no worries. It's a great build.
     
  4. Ziero

    Ziero TFW2005 Supporter

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    I'm no Gundam expert, but I have gotten plenty of different MG Gundams from all different series over the years (which I ironically just pulled out of storage last night) and most of them have very similar articulation.

    Just looking at the pic you can see the double jointed elbows, upper arm swivel, ball joint hands and hinged fingers. Shoulders are probably ball joints too, with the pads having some articulation as well. Neck usually has a decent ball joint with plenty of clearance to move the head in every direction. Waist and hips are usually hindered by the skirt, you can angle the waist but not fully turn it, and the legs would most likely be able to come up anywhere between 45-90 degrees from the bot, depending on how the front skirt is attached. Knees are usually double jointed allowing for a decent kneeling pose and ankles are again often ball joints.

    MG model kits often have a lot of articulation, but their size will frequently leave ball joints floppy and weak when too much weight is involved.

    Though someone who actually has that model might be able to give you better insight.

    Edit: Like they say, a picture is worth a thousand words.
     
  5. bumblebot98

    bumblebot98 Banned

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    Is it hard to build?
     
  6. Ziero

    Ziero TFW2005 Supporter

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    Time consuming, but rarely actually difficult from my experiences. Just make sure to have a sharp hobby knife (for cutting pieces out of the trees and trimming any excess plastic) and maybe some modeling glue. Though they're 90% snap together kits, the better ones will often feature very tiny pieces that can pop off easily. A little dab of glue will stop that from happening.
     
  7. bumblebot98

    bumblebot98 Banned

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  8. mx-01 archon

    mx-01 archon Well-Known Member

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    Ball jointed fingers, with the index separate and the other three fused together, but separatable with a hobby knife if you desire the extra articulation (I just find it a bit too fiddly, though, so I tend to leave them as is).

    Universal shoulders, with extra torso-side jointing allowing shoulder shrugs and forward/back curls.

    Double joint neck, with hinge at the torso and ball under the helmet.

    The hips on the MK-II 2.0 are on a swing bar that changes their axis of motion. It can actually bring its knees up in front of its chest. The HD recolour version is based on the Titans Ver. kit, which redesigned the waist articulation. It's capable of twisting 360 degrees at the waist without hinderance.

    More modern MG kits have greatly improved on joint strength and durability. Many of the recent releases, provided that they're not based on super-fiddly transforming designs (Unicorn comes to mind) are very solid, almost toy-like.
     
  9. mx-01 archon

    mx-01 archon Well-Known Member

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    As for the HCM-Pro, the whole line is pretty great, with sharp sculpts and solid builds and great articulation. Be aware that at 1/200 scale, it's tiny, about GIJoe-sized.
     
  10. bumblebot98

    bumblebot98 Banned

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    Would i Have to build the HCM-Pro?
     
  11. mx-01 archon

    mx-01 archon Well-Known Member

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    No. It's an action figure.

    The most "model-like" think you have to do with it is snip the extra hands (and optional solid V-Fin) off a runner.

    It's not as obscenely articulated as the MG, though, of course.
     
  12. zealottoyou

    zealottoyou Well-Known Member

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    The HCM-pro are mostly 1/200 scale. so they are fairly tiny. Fix Figuration line are 1/144 or close to that scale.

    MG Mk-II 2.0 is one of the first 2.0 MG models and it is a must-buy if you are into gundam modeling. It usually take no more than 2 days to snap a model. But if you want best result 2-6 months is not unusual consider how much time one spends on painting and polishing it.
     

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