Customs: how do you kitbash?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by jnmx2000, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. jnmx2000

    jnmx2000 classics

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2006
    Posts:
    667
    Trophy Points:
    146
    Likes:
    +0
    ok, i have several questions about this considering i'd love to attempt to kitbash myself, but i don't know how to really begin. so, i have some questions if anyone would be kind enough to aswer them.

    my first question is, how do you remove the pins from the toys? i'd like to kitbash OP from the classics line and i don't want to damage the toy in the process and i'd also like to do the same to the classics megs.

    second question. whats a better way to prep your toy for repaint, prime or sanding. i've heard of both i think or i just might be dumb lol and which way is the better way to prep for a repaint?

    3. where do you get the paint and utilities to repaint and kitbash your toys. where should i go to for the best supplies and what supplies do you usually use or are preferred by many to use?

    i might have more questions but i can't think of any right now, if there is already a thread on this then one of the admins can join this with that thread and i would like to know where that tread is. i'm sure i'm not the only one around that wants to know how to kitbash so any help would be appriciatied, thanks.
     
  2. fschuler

    fschuler Member TFW2005 Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Posts:
    2,202
    Trophy Points:
    216
    Likes:
    +0
    There's a stickied thread here:

    http://www.tfw2005.com/boards/showthread.php?t=87627

    It was put together by one of our prolific kitbashers here, Ops_was_a_truck. Have a look see! Many of the questions you posed are covered in his thead, but I'll offer up some advice as well (some or all of which may be in his thread).

    1) Pins can sometimes be tough (and Classics Megs has a couple particularly tough ones, as I understand it). There are several different ways, but the one I've used the most is to heat the pin using a soldering iron with a fine point so that the surrounding plastic softens just enough to let the pin slide out. Gotta be careful not to let the iron slip off of the pin and onto the plastic, though! Some pins can just be driven out by placing the part onto a smooth firm surface cushioned by a thin sheet of padding (rubber mat, maybe) and tapping the pin out with a precision screwdriver and a hammer or some other striking tool.

    2) The only prep I usually do is to wipe the parts down with alcohol to get any oil and dirt off of the surface. 91% Isopropyl alcohol or denatured alcohol (methanol) work quite well. And, to prime or not to prime depends on the type of paint you use (some don't require primer) and the amount and type of use the item will get (if you're gonna play with it, better use something durable...I use Testor's Acryl acrylic paints...others have had a lot of luck with Krylon Fusion paints)

    3) I get all of my stuff at Walmart! Hobby shops also offer a lot of fancy and high quality paints, brushes, and other supplies.
     
  3. jnmx2000

    jnmx2000 classics

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2006
    Posts:
    667
    Trophy Points:
    146
    Likes:
    +0
    Thank You!

    can i delete this thread or can someone else do it?
     
  4. fschuler

    fschuler Member TFW2005 Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Posts:
    2,202
    Trophy Points:
    216
    Likes:
    +0
    A mod can take care of it for you, unless you have some questions that aren't covered in the stickied thread!
     
  5. Katamari Prime

    Katamari Prime Hassan Chop! TFW2005 Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Posts:
    7,220
    Trophy Points:
    262
    Likes:
    +4
    I've found that primer helps bring out the overall effect of what your doing. White for good guys, grey for mechanics , black primer for bad buys. and an Air brush provides control and mixing for the colors, and is more likley to sold to you if your under 18.
     
  6. fschuler

    fschuler Member TFW2005 Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Posts:
    2,202
    Trophy Points:
    216
    Likes:
    +0
    I guess you've done a lot of figurine painting? I did some of that ages ago, and I agree that the primer color has a big effect on the brightness of the finished product. Most of the TF stuff I do gets several layers of base and top coat, so, there isn't much lingering effect from the primer color. Of course, there are instances where you just can't lay down a very thick coat of paint due to the reduction in clearance between moving parts as the paint thickness builds up.

    Did that stickied kitbasher's resource thread help you out?
     

Share This Page