Customs: How do you do it?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Rexidus, Sep 15, 2010.

  1. Rexidus

    Rexidus Autobot TFW2005 Supporter

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    So I've got a Drift I've repainted and I am constantly having problems with chipping. I keep asking this question but rather than try to collect the data from a bunch of sources I thought I'd just try to ask.

    Let me clarify that I'm not having issues because I need to sand down pegs. That I get and can do. I'm having trouble where pieces just scrape against each other during transformation. Like when the doors on drift rub against the back end of the car while you are trying to attach/detach them to each other (again, not the physical peg).

    In my own attempt I first used a light coating of Krylon Low Odor Clear Finish. Didn't do squat. I just recently tried to use the same product but to coat the ever loving crap out of it. Still did jack. Also just for you info, yes I did wash the figure before painting.


    What is the best method to finish a dry brushed figure and with what product?

    I know about the tutorials and dying a figure. But I see people with these amazing figures they say they dry brush and I want mine to be that cool.

    Also, second question. What is the best method period to painting a figure? IE what gives you the best looking usable end product and what specific products do they use?
     
  2. deliciouspeter

    deliciouspeter Back in Black TFW2005 Supporter

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    You'll get better at this through experience, not only with prepping, but with different kinds of paint. What kind of paint are you using? While there is no "best" method or product, different paint has different properties, even within the same brand. For example, I primarily use testors acrylics and the flat black is almost unchippable, while the lighter colors seem to always need extra care.

    Also some paint is meant to be thinned down before use. Be sure to check instructions for that, as well as drying and curing times.

    Drift is a pretty complex, scrape-happy transformer, so this is a challenge from the start. For a light colored bot like him, dying might be an option, but that's another topic.

    Here's what I do.

    1. Lightly sand the areas that are going to rub. With a fine sandpaper, in the 280-320 range. Sometimes you have to paint it first before you realize where the scrape points are, sometimes you'll know right away where the problems are. For complex, friction heavy points like ball joints, use a black marker to neutralize bright colors.

    2.Thin coats, and let them cure completely between each coat. Depending on the paint, this could be hours, or days. Again, read the instructions on the paint to be sure. Using spraypaint in a can is tricky because it will spray somewhat uneven. The point is to be patient.

    3. Test, revise, repair. After you finish up, put it back together, transform it, and a huge chip pops off. Well...just start over. Lightly sand the affected area and repaint it. If you're using spraypaint and you don't want to add another coat, just spray into a paint jar and use a touchup brush.

    4. Throw it away and start over. Practice makes perfect.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2010
  3. Sioce

    Sioce Radicon in training

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    It is probably the primer (or lack there of) that is the problem.
    I like to base coat with krylon fusion. It adheres to plastic very well, as long as the surface is clean.

    I generally wash my figures in a light alchohol bath then rinse them with water several times to make sure they are very clean. Then coat it a couple times with krylon fusion, and taadaa a nice paint job. Then just typically detail using either tamiya, or model master paints and coat it with dullcote. Gives me a good result everytime.

    The prep work, to me, is more important than the paint job. If the prep is not done properly, it makes no difference how nice your paint job is, because it will just chip off.

    I use testors dullcote for all of my finishing. It can be a little pricey if you need a lot of it. But it is worth the cost.
     
  4. Jericho

    Jericho Well-Known Member

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    what about a top coat, what would one suggest for that to not only give it a nice shine, but also protect joints?
     
  5. Anti-Venom

    Anti-Venom Well-Known Member

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    Well there is no way to really protect joints from chipping.

    But this right HERE is an awesome sealer :) 
     
  6. Rexidus

    Rexidus Autobot TFW2005 Supporter

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    Once again, the tutorial forum has kicked my rear with its goodness.

    I bow to the masters and sacrifice 3 virgin chickens in their name.
     

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