Customs: Help:Drybrushing smaller details

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by iuJacob, Jan 2, 2018.

  1. iuJacob

    iuJacob Well-Known Member

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    So after struggling with the 'how the hell are people painting with brushes and not getting brush strokes?!' dilemma, (and yes I tried with using thinner. I'm still terrible)...

    I found out that the look I like is primarily dry brushing anyway.

    However, it obviously doesn't offer the same amount of precision as brushing wet does.

    So what's the secret? How are people doing it?

    Just masking off the surrounding areas, and going to town?


    Edit: for example, here's a crap thing I'm working on. It's a BW Igaunus. For example, on the thigh, there are those horizontal ridges.

    On the calves, Where the details are in his legs, the tan colour has now gotten all over the 'metal' I did. There's also those little spikes sticking out of his legs that now have 3 different colours of paint on them.

    Or on the hands, where the silver paint has now runeth over into the lizard tan colours.

    And then there's the head. I have an older phone so the camera is shite. But you can sortof see all the details in his face.

    IMG_2641.JPG IMG_2642.JPG IMG_2643.JPG IMG_2644.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
  2. Yaujta

    Yaujta Breadchildren. TFW2005 Supporter

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    Dry brushing can be super easy or frustrating as hell. Depends on the desired effect.

    My personal method:
    -Good acrylics are best, not craft paint. I recommend either Valejo or Testors.
    -For brushes, I prefer stiff bristle block brushes. Again, none of those craft ones. They're crap. I use at least three, from very small to about 1/2-inch, depending on the surface.
    Process:
    -Dip the brush tip in some paint, then wipe it off on a cloth or napkin to the point where it looks like it's clean. Drag the brush across the surface to paint, and some color should show. Repeat until satisfied.
    I usually use either very light strokes or very fast ones (out of context that sounds so wrong).
    Also, I like to layer the dry brushing. First coat would be close to the base color, then by the third it fourth hit, the highlights really start showing. I've found that one shot dry brushing looks kind of unfinished or sloppy.
     
  3. iuJacob

    iuJacob Well-Known Member

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    My apologies, I had never seen there was a reply to this thread. I forgot to add it to my watch list.

    While your reply is appreciated and insightful for drybrushing in general, I was wondering if there was a specific technique that would be used to do the smaller/tiny details, or when different coloured parts are right next to each other.

    For example (bot mode):




    Though I suppose the answer is probably to do a ton of masking, or those smaller parts are just a wet brush. Though he specifically mentions in his video he doesn’t have small brushes, so that makes me wonder how he did them.

    I tried dry brushing with a tiny brush, which doesn’t seem to work at all, unless there’s some secret I don’t know about. You mentioned in your post you are using smaller brushes?

    Thank you.
     
  4. Yaujta

    Yaujta Breadchildren. TFW2005 Supporter

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    Block brushes are perfect for this. They have either a square end or angled like a chisel.
    They come in very small sizes. I use these for car grills, louvered detailing and light covers and the like.

    I went digging for some drybrush examples I've done, so here are a couple. I don't drybrush all that often, but these show how it can work.
    The front vent pieces were drybrushed with silver over top of dark gray:
    [​IMG]
    The hip vents were drybrushed silver on top of black:
    [​IMG]
    Back vents, silver on metallic purple:
    [​IMG]
    Chest turbines, silver on dark silver:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. big hank

    big hank Resident Slacker-Basher

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    When l.was a kid (waaaaaaaaay long ago) l used to do 1:35 armor and 1:72 aircraft. One tip an old timer told me about drybrushing is that the key is restraint. He was a firm believer that by the time you can see the effect it's already too much. He was an amazing painter. Unfollow his lead though to my eye a bit heavier than he recommended works best for me.

    Now along with better quality paints, a good quality brush is just as important. I tend to use mid priced Windsor and Newton Sable brushes. I have fox as well. Both of these will help you not have unrealistic brush strokes, and improve your work.

    Also oddly enough a "worn" or well used brush, wide and flat works better for me. Even with smaller areas.

    My go to drybrush for small areas is about a 1/4 " wide and flat....
     
  6. Toker

    Toker Well-Known Member

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    Can you link an example of a block brush? My Google-fu only came up with larger sizes that look like they're for painting walls.
     
  7. Yaujta

    Yaujta Breadchildren. TFW2005 Supporter

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    Look up chisel brush. That's the actual name.
    Sorry about that.
     

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