Guitar Question

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by TheDemonDzko, May 11, 2009.

  1. TheDemonDzko

    TheDemonDzko °-{[●□●]}-° {Beep. Boop.)

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    So I have been playing guitar for a couple years. But I still have no idea how to hammer.... So any body on TFW know how to hammer?
     
  2. jon

    jon That dude from the forest

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    hey man ive been playing for 7 years now and i think i can help. pretty much a hammer on is playing a string open for example the d string. then quickly while it is still ringing fret it. for example again the 5th fret so now it sounds like a g. you dont have to play the string first either you can just fret the string while it is silent and you will hear it. but for a more 'textbook' answer here is what wikipedia has to say :

    "Hammer-on is a stringed instrument playing technique performed (especially on guitar) by sharply bringing a fretting-hand finger down on the fingerboard behind a fret, causing a note to sound. This technique is the opposite of the pull-off. Passages in which a large proportion of the notes are performed as hammer-ons and pull-offs instead of being plucked or picked in the usual fashion are known in classical guitar terminology as legato phrases. The sound is smoother and more connected than in a normally picked phrase, due to the absence of the otherwise necessity to synchronise the plucking of one hand with the fingering on the fretboard with the other hand; however, the resulting sounds are not as brightly audible, precisely due to the absence of the plucking of the string, the vibration of the string from an earlier plucking dying off. The technique also facilitates very fast playing because the picking hand does not have to move at such a high rate, and coordination between the hands only has to be achieved at certain points. Multiple hammer-ons and pull-offs together are sometimes also referred to colloquially as "rolls,"[citation needed] a reference to the fluid sound of the technique. A hammer-on is usually represented in guitar tablature (especially that created by computer) by a letter h. A rapid series of alternating hammer-ons and pull-offs between a single pair of notes is called a trill."

    hope that helps a little!
     
  3. TheDemonDzko

    TheDemonDzko °-{[●□●]}-° {Beep. Boop.)

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    That helps alot, but could you show me an example? Like I know they use them in the song Schism by tool but I still dont understand how to.
     
  4. jon

    jon That dude from the forest

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  5. Malikon

    Malikon Well-Known Member

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    maybe this'll help, you mentioned Schism so I used that for the lesson.

    [​IMG]

    It's really easy, hit your open 'D' string ONCE, then while it's ringing 'hammer' your index finger/Left hand onto the 10th fret hard, then while that note is still ringing, 'hammer' your ring finger/Left hand onto the 12th fret. This way you hit the string with a pick once, but you hear 3 notes.

    Look up 'Legato,' the legato style of guitar is all hammer ons/pulls offs/slides/slurs, it's a very fluid and smooth sounding style because you don't hear the attack of the pick, you hear the notes themselves. Try looking up Joe Satriani (anything on Surfing with the Alien) or look up Alex Skolnick from Testament, he was a big legato player as well.

    I teach guitar for a living, so if you have any questions later you can PM me if you want.
     
  6. MetalRyde

    MetalRyde is an a-hole with a heart.

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    strum the bar while holding the first button then push the other buttons...

    serious though, im trying to relearn how to play a real guitar. used to play one for 4 years for church. but that was 10 years ago. my uncle gave me one he got at a flea market... looks crappy but still sounds good
     
  7. eyeballkid

    eyeballkid Old

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    Hammer ons and pull offs are easy and fun! Next on the lesson plan, tapping!
     
  8. Malikon

    Malikon Well-Known Member

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    Now tapping is super easy.

    Probably why lots of people like to do it, lol.

    First you've got to get used to using both hands in synch. Personally I hold onto my pick, some people 'palm' the pick and tap with their right hand index finger. I discourage this in my students, it's a good way to drop your pick, especially when you're sweating on stage. So using your right hand middle finger, push the string down hard and fast so that you get a strong solid sounding note. Now once your finger is down you sort of flick it in one direction or another, if I'm tapping slowly I personally flick my finger towards the floor, but if I'm tapping really fast I tend to pull my finger up. It's just a matter of doing it until it's comfortable.
    Now your flicking the string either to an open string or a note you're fretting with your left hand. By combining with hammer-on's you can make a strong fast flurry of notes go by. Just think of it as a pattern: Tap/flick/hammer/hammer-Tap/flick/hammer/hammer-ETC.

    Remember that (usually) the notes you tap are outlining a chord, or chord progression. In the example I just made you I used the 2 most common chords, E major and A minor. (also going from E to Am is very 'classical' sounding)

    [​IMG]

    In the future to come up with your own tapping stuff, find a chord you like, say E minor. E minor is made of 3 notes: E,G,B, now look at your open E string, you've already got the E note, where is G and B? G is the 3rd fret and B is the 7th fret, and 12th fret is another E. So you can tap on your high E string: 12th, open, 3rd, 7th (repeat), and this is going: E, E, G, B, E, E, G, B, etc.

    So you're outlining a chord. This works for all chords. Remember you don't have to use open strings, you can block off the string with your left hand/First finger.

    Good luck man.

    Next lesson: 4 octave 6 string swept arpeggios. :D  Lol.

    (just kidding, but like I said earlier, teaching insane guitar is my job, so if anyone ever has questions they can PM me or post here and I'll try to answer and write a short lesson for you if I have a moment)
     
  9. eyeballkid

    eyeballkid Old

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    Hey man, when you get hammer ons down, try playing a note, hammer on and off repediately until the sound dies off, it is wicked! You can do it fast or slow, like a woman.
     
  10. Malikon

    Malikon Well-Known Member

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    it's called a trill. You're trilling between 2 notes. Tony Iommi uses it alot. (War Pigs being a good example)

    It's actually a really good way to build strength and endurance in your left hand. Try doing it with your ring finger and pinkie for a real workout.
     

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