Customs: Got a dremel,

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by UnicronFTW, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. UnicronFTW

    UnicronFTW Don't blink.

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    So, what are the best drill bits to use when cutting in to plastic? I don't want to ruin the plastic or the bits by making a stupid mistake...
     
  2. hXcpunk23

    hXcpunk23 The Chaos Bringer

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    Ebay:
    Cut-off Wheels
    Heavy Duty Cut-off Wheels
    Diamond Wheels

    I also use drill bits and sanding bits of various sizes.

    When cutting thin/small areas or thin layers of plastic, opt for the lower speed. When cutting the larger pieces of plastic, go for the higher speed. And BE CAREFUL! Cut-off and Heavy Duty wheels tend to snap easily if you aren't careful or don't keep a straight line going. Make sure you have eye protection (those flying bits can literally blind you). Just start small and learn a bit with it and with the styrene or plastic, then take on larger pieces/projects.

    Good luck!
     
  3. Treadshot A1

    Treadshot A1 Or just 'A1' for short...

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    And also buy a lot of Cut-Off wheels. I generally use the thinner ones, which are great for cutting without removing too much material, but they snap so easily. I'm down to just 2 left right now, and on average i'd say they snap once every 20 cuts i make as a rough guess. While they are great for cutting, try to find ways to get more of thsoe wheels. I generally stick to buying larger kits, as the separate bits often cost a lot for what they are.

    Drill bits are actually quite...well, it's a personal preference thing. My general purpose drill bit is a 3mm diameter bit, and it's great for drilling almost anything. Slow speed for pilot holes, then go slightly faster to actually make the hole. That said, some of the engraving bits make better drills than engravers, and they're less likely to catch than my drill bit in my experience. Considering you'll most likely be cutting through plastic that's only a few millimeters thin, consider some of the engraving bits as well, as they can be quite useful. After all, engraving is just elegant drilling. :lol 
     

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