Customs: Going to start a scratchbuild, need advice.

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by RedPrime, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. RedPrime

    RedPrime Well-Known Member

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    Ok, I know this is my first custom, and it sounds a little complicated and ambitious, but I want to make a custom fort max that will be able to store legends-class transformers. I do have a few questions regarding certain aspects of this project:

    -Is it possible/reccomended to use sculpey to build limbs for something this epic?
    -Is real sculpey better than other polyclay?
    -Do they make larger bricks of sculpey than the 2-ounce ones at hobby lobby? and if so, how much?
    -Can you paint transparent sculpey into a transparent color?
    -I have lego ratchet joints from some old technic sets, would they be too small for a custom of this magnitude?
    -How do you make custom ball joints? I want to make max's wrists extra-poseable, and I got the inspiration for this from rotf prime's ankles. I have bionicle ball joints (plenty), and those are what I plan on using for cerebros.
    -What paint would you reccomend?

    After I draw up my plans for this, I want to make it sort of like a model kit, and use posts to snap the pieces together then glue them. If all goes well, I plan to have the plans done by the end of next week, and then start on the actual full figure. I'm not really as worried about messing up on fort max though as much as I am with cerebros and spike, since theyre smaller. All help will be greatly appreciated.

    -Red
     
  2. Boggs6ft7

    Boggs6ft7 TFW2005 Supporter

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    I'm going to be the Debbie Downer here and suggest that you don't try this for your first scratchbuild. I'm all for shooting for the moon, but I'm afraid you're going to run into problems, get frustrated, and you'll never finish your project.

    I would start on something much smaller and then move on from that. I'm saying this from my own experience and the experience of others on the board.
     
  3. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    I'm going to have to agree here, but only caveat what Boggs said with "depending on your skill level and your comfort with the methods". I think if you've got some modeling experience prior to posting here, you may not have too many problems. However, if you've never done anything remotely close to making a custom, then I'll simply stand by what Boggs said.

    Whatever you end up doing, keep us posted :thumb 
     
  4. Boggs6ft7

    Boggs6ft7 TFW2005 Supporter

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    Yeah, I should have stated that. I'm not sure what your skill level was and I assumed you were coming into this with no experience, I apologize if that is not the case. Please post what you do though.
     
  5. deliciouspeter

    deliciouspeter Back in Black TFW2005 Supporter

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    I'll chime in too. Do a couple small guys first. Work with materials and different paints to see what you like.

    If you're dead set on fort max, do a smaller scale prototype. Most builders/woodworkers/carpenters do.

    Nothing worse than spending a lot of time on something and not getting it done.

    For your specific questions:
    Sculpey: is not good for any part that will have any sort of stress, especially limbs. As it bakes, it can change shape too.

    Balljoints: Bionicles should work fine, but again, this is a reason you want to start a little smaller. Test things out, experiment, and fail a few times. Be ready to toss everything in the garbage and start over. The most important thing is to learn while you do this.

    Paint: I prefer Testors acrylic paint (water cleanup), but that is because I have severe space limitations and a wife. Many use enamel model paints. I'd get a cheap $7 model kit, a cheap set of paints and experiment a bit on this too.

    Good luck! Post some progress shots when you have some.
     
  6. REDLINE

    REDLINE longer days, plz? Veteran

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    in addition to echoing everyone else in this thread, I'll also add that I'd avoid sculpy for something that massive, and go with Aves Fixit Sculpt or their Apoxie Sculpt. Yes, clear stuff can be painted with clear paints. I can't image lego joints being nearly large enough for something so huge and heavy. people don't make their own balljoints really (save for the socket side, which can be done with a drill) they either pirate them off donor bodies or get those packs of balljoints from hlj.com or other places.

    Oh, yes you could use sculpt for limbs, but that stuff gets heavy real quick when you're using a large quantity, so you're better off cutting sheets of styrene and gluing them together. use the sculpt material to compliment it and not substitute it. oh, Aves stuff comes in 1/4 pound cups at the smallest quantities, and you can get 1 pound as well.
     
  7. aurascope

    aurascope Kitbash Resource Indexer

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