George A. Romero Visual Style?

Discussion in 'Movies and Television' started by GuitarHero09, Nov 16, 2009.

  1. GuitarHero09

    GuitarHero09 Well-Known Member

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    So I'm writing a paper on the visual elements that appear in Mr. Romero's films. Does anyone with knowledge of cinema have any input? Anything is appreciated.
     
  2. eyeballkid

    eyeballkid Old

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    I'll bite. I don't think he really even has a visual style. I think he is good with selecting actors, and he certainly has some good ideas. It is very easy to tell what era his most memorable films were made in. I.E. Night was made in the 60's, Dawn in the 70's, Day in the 80's, Land in the 2000's...ect. I think he borrows from other directors a lot, hell he even made a Blair Witch ripoff. What he did contribute to cinema, in terms of visuals, has a lot to do with Tom Salvini. Everybody knows that George is responsible for the classic imagery of zombies, but Tom was the guy that got bloody.
     
  3. smkspy

    smkspy is one nice fucking kitty

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    And I'll add that most of "revolutionary" break-throughs that are credited to Romero for Night of the Living Dead were never intentional decisions on his part. The lead actor being a black male in the 1960s was entirely because he was best actor of the small group of friends performing in the movie. The dynamic camera work credited to the movie is a result of the production being extremely low budget and filmed in B&W, again for budget reasons. Finally, the so-called racial commentary with the protagionist being black and subsequently being killed by bloodthristy rednecks was entirely coincidence, and Romero has repeated this several times, yet the myth of TNTLD persists.
     
  4. Aernaroth

    Aernaroth <b><font color=blue>I voted for Super_Megatron and Veteran

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    He's a big fan of visual allegory, if you can count that. The Zombies, in terms of their habits and appearance, are always meant to symbolize something, usually related to the lower social classes. In NoTLD, they symbolize a mob mentality, in DawnoTD, they symbolize our consumer culture, and in LoTD, they symbolize the eventual rise of the lower class against a capitalistic and opressive upper class. I haven't seen his two more recent projects, but the initial plan for his zombie series was for the zombies to slowly regain their intelligence, turning into an organized army that eventually conquered and ruled the world.

    His use of the motorcycle in Knightriders is also symbolic, using the modern motorcycle not only as a tie to modern times, but to the "mounted" knights of old. Furthermore, the motorcycle is a symbol of the characters' removal from society as "outlaws", driving home the whole "travelling band" / "arthurian quest" motif.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2009
  5. funkatron101

    funkatron101 TFW2005 Supporter

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    ...and yet it all came together so wonderfully.
     
  6. smkspy

    smkspy is one nice fucking kitty

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    Absolutely, and there is no doubt that those elements have worked their way into the film... unintentionally as they may be. It just bugs me to no end when I hear people discussing it like it was intentional, grand statement on society's racism when Romero has repeatedly said it wasn't. Now that I think about it, I'm quite surprised at how often it gets discussed.
     

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