G1 Prime pelvis axle disassembly

Discussion in 'Transformers Toy Discussion' started by cdub, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. cdub

    cdub Member

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    What does it take to get the wheels off the axle on an early G1 prime?

    I've seen a few posts mentioning that "it's difficult", but no details. I've got my childhood G1 Prime disassembled on my desk right now but can't get the axle apart to get the legs off.

    Is one of the ends threaded or something? Do you have to force one of the wheels off?

    Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks
     
  2. Nightwind

    Nightwind Aka Dusty Bottoms.

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    I would actually like to know this as well as I'm planning a G1 Prime custom shortly... Maybe a Radicon would be able to provide further assitance?
     
  3. TM2 D-bot

    TM2 D-bot Forsight Into the Future Veteran

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    Remember to get to the screw in front of his tire. Completely disassemble the cab (take out arms, seats, and front window). Pry the front grill off carefully since if you use to much force it will warp or the bumper will crack. The grille is held on by pressure tabs, which you can pry loose with a butter knife. To remove the wheels you need to pull of the pins which have to be done either by pulling on the wheels (which could probably break them off) or heating the pin. The axle will the slide out leaving the spring and legs free.

    If you are repairing the legs off a Prime, I suggest just buying another cab and swapping the front lower section between them (chrome leg pieces, wheels, axles, springs, front grille, and bumper). It's much easier and a junker cab on Ebay doesn't cost that much.
     
  4. cdub

    cdub Member

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    axle detail

    Thank you for the tip.

    Looking at the end of the axle, it would appear there is an inner axle and an outer bushing the wheel rides on.

    When you heat the axle, does this outer bushing come off, or does the plastic wheel just warm up enough to pull over the bushing?

    Thank you so much for responding.
     
  5. cdub

    cdub Member

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    UPDATE, partial progress

    I heated the shaft and pulled the gooey wheel over the bushing.
    Then I put the axle/bushing in a vise and tapped the axle out of the bushing.

    I only did one side, but the spring, leg, and middle plastic piece are all still right where they were.

    Is there some trick to getting the shoulder that the spring is set against off?
     
  6. TM2 D-bot

    TM2 D-bot Forsight Into the Future Veteran

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    You mean the red jagged tap that juts out from the center base of the cab? Since you removed the tire, you should be able to push the spring out of the axle hole by squeezing it out using the thigh as a shimmy. Or, you can remove the other side and have the whole axle free and just pull it out with a vise.
     
  7. cdub

    cdub Member

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    COMPLETE - update

    Thank you all for your advice on this.

    As I posted earlier, I heated axle and pulled the wheel off.

    I used a vise, hammer, and punch to get the actual wheel bushing off the shaft.

    The red plastic half of the waist easily came off.

    The hub retaining the spring for the leg was corroded to the shaft and required the vise and hammer to pop out as well. From there, everything came apart as expected.

    My repair is now complete. I took the pieces of the broken leg and super glued them back together to give a shell. Then I cut some small sheetmetal pieces and bent them to fill in the portion of the leg (backside) I was missing. I used epoxy to put it in. Then, I filled the open cavity of the leg with liquid nails and let it dry over the weekend. This should effectively bond the sheetmetal to the various plastic pieces.

    For cosmetics, I filled in the remaining void with another type of epoxy filler and sanded flush. Finally, I masked off the front of the legs to retain the original "chrome" and shot the back of the legs with chrome spray paint.

    Finally, I reassembled and it looks great! The only issue is the wheel I heated to remove had to be drilled out to get it back on. It looks good, but doesn't roll as smoothly as it should.

    Thanks again!!
     

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