G1 Blurr Review

Discussion in 'Transformers Feedback & Reviews' started by Philister, Sep 14, 2009.

  1. Philister

    Philister Teutonicons Rising!

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    Robot Modes: In 1986 the Transformers stopped consisting of previously existing Diaclone and Microman toys and instead started producing original figures of their own. Blurr is among the first of these Transformers originals and the sharp turn from the previous designs is very much evident in him. This is where Transformers started to be more about the robot mode, rather than a realistic alternate mode. Blurr is actually a pretty good match look-wise to the character we saw in the 1986 movie and the 3rd season of the cartoon series. His face is very well sculpted and looks great.

    In terms of posability Blurr actually isn't bad for a figure from that time. He can move his arms at the shoulders and his legs at the hips and knees. Sadly he can only bend his legs backwards at the hip, so running poses aren't really in the cards. I don't think it would have been all that hard to make bending the legs forward possible, but whatever. Didn't happen, so Blurr's posability isn't as good as it could be. Still, though, pretty good for a G1 figure from that time.

    Blurr carries a black pistol/rifle as a weapon, as well as a kind of shield that forms the front of his vehicle mode. Never used it in the series or movie as far as I can recall. Anyway, Blurr is a pretty good-looking figure and, for his time at least, decently posable. So no obvious complaints except that they could have done better with the leg movement.

    Alternate Mode: The movie and season 3 characters were also the first to abandon realistic alternate modes in terms of more science fiction oriented vehicles. Blurr is no exception. He transforms into a kind of futuristic hover car. The hover part was seen on screen, where the car always floated above the ground, but the actual toy still has wheels to roll on. Kind of hard to make a toy hover, I guess. Anyway, Blurr's vehicle mode is a very low, sleek, aerodynamic car which fits his image as a speedy courier. All the parts fit together quite well, making for a very wholesome look.

    The only slight flaw in this mode is that Blurr's robot head isn't completly hidden from view. You can see his face in the slight gap behind the cockpit. Another thing that could easily have been improved with some kind of panel, I think, but it's the only downside to this mode. Bottom line: A good looking car mode if you like science fiction type vehicles.

    Remarks: Blurr was one of the main characters of the third season of the G1 cartoon series. He talked fast, he moved fast, he got on everyone's nerves (but not as much as Wheelie), but he did put up good fights against the likes of the Predacons and the Sweeps. Blurr later became a Targetmaster in the infamous fourth season of G1. The figure remained unchanged except for a plug where one could mount the Targetmaster weapon in vehicle mode.

    As a toy Blurr is a pretty good example of the kind of figure Transformers put out in the years following the 1986 movie. He looks good, he isn't very posable (by today's standards), his robot mode clearly takes precedence over the vehicle mode, which is more futuristic than realistic. That said, he's a good figure that nicely captures the cartoon character. Not as good as he could have been with some pretty minor adjustments, but still good. Recommended to G1 fans.

    Rating: B
     
  2. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    I will just admit my own bias, as I am a pretty big Targetmaster fan. I've owned both, but really saw little need to have two in my collection. I'll leave it up to you guys to figure out which one I parted with :wink: 

    As for the figure itself, I'm quite the fan. I find it a bit difficult to judge a vintage toy by today's toy technology and standards, though. I'd have to say I'd also recommend this guy if you can find a really nice one :) 
     

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