Ever record an album?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by alfred p. sloan, Aug 20, 2011.

  1. alfred p. sloan

    alfred p. sloan Well-Known Member

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    So I just finished mastering my latest record (DRiP - Man Of The People) and learned so much. In December I plan to follow it up and can't wait to apply all the new things I have Learned.

    This is not my first recording, I have been in front of microphones since I was 10 years old. Still have some of that terrible stuff. Never the less I find each project teaches me a ton of new things about how to make great recordings.

    First of all: CONTENT. What good is 84 tracks of digital canvas if you have nothing to say, or can't craft a song? I like to think I am improving as a songwriter all the time.

    Next is having a plan. What sounds do you want. Don't get me wrong, there is plenty of room for improvisation but knowing what you want will improve your chances of getting it. If you have a lovely vocal melody you may not want to start loading up the tracks with walls of abrasive guitars. It's all relative, but keep in mind you are building the recording piece by piece and the all must fit together. I found making a killer solo track (i.e. great drum track) without considering where it will fit in the song will only lead to frustration.

    After you diagnose where there Instruments fit in, choose the tones you want. Don't go for a subwoofer rattling bass track that mutilates the kick drum. Choose a bass sound and tone that works to serve the song. Don't go for heavy layering either, often you'll find, less is more.

    Always take time to edit mistakes. Recording is your chance to get it right, don't be in too much of a rush at this stage. Those mistakes you left in will haunt you forever. If you are an excellent player, see if you can nail it down in one take, but don't be shocked that it wasn't perfect.

    GET THE LEAD VOCAL PERFECT! even if there is a small mistake somewhere in the song the only thing audiences will notice is if the vocals suck. Teach your vocalist mic technique so you don't have to over compress the vocal. You'll be glad you did. Make sure the melody is worked out ahead of time, or prepare for a hundred do-overs. If your vocalist is unsteady spend some time beforehand working out the lines and melodies, change the songs key or at worst re-write a part that isn't working.

    Mixing is just as important as recording. Spend as much time as you can afford mixing the record. Listen to the songs with both major and minor mix variations and determine the best compromise. That's exactly what recording and mixing is, a compromise. You may sound great as a live act but you will have to jam all those elements onto two stereo tracks.

    Mastering. Not quite as critical as recording or mixing but a solid mastering can bring out sparkle and flash to an underperforming recording. Just keep in mind that mastering can only buff out the scratches in the paint, not fix dents.



    So what about you? You've done some recording, either at home or pro? Lets discuss our trials and tribulations here. Thanks, - ALFRED P. SLOAN.




    DRiP - Man of the People (copyright 2011 NONE Records LTD.)
     
  2. OptimusScream

    OptimusScream 5 SECOND LEADER

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    im thinking of recording 1 becauce i have a good singing voice
     
  3. ORIO

    ORIO Plant-Based Bot Super Mod News Staff

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    Been in three bands and have released one ful length and 10 eps
     
  4. alfred p. sloan

    alfred p. sloan Well-Known Member

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    orio - how did you like the recording aspect of it?
     
  5. autobotblaster

    autobotblaster Y U NO!?!?!

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    i have actually just begun the process of recording an album with my band. its scary, but i know it will be worth it in the end.
     
  6. megatroptimus

    megatroptimus Translatorminator

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    The Musitards have recorded 6 albums so far. They rock.

    :p 
     
  7. alfred p. sloan

    alfred p. sloan Well-Known Member

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    Musitards - to the rescue!

    AUTOBOTBLASTER - What kind of album? what do you play? How is it going?
     
  8. Grimlock_13

    Grimlock_13 Rattrap Teabag

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    I've recorded a couple demos for my old band as well as two albums one of my best friends wrote (I play drums). He used to have a MySpace page with some songs on it but he deleted it a long time ago when MySpace became a ghost town. They were released independantly, but I think they can be found on CDbaby.com. I'll have to double check. Since then he's also recorded songs or a Country album he's currently mixing down and mastering, which I also played drums on a few tracks. I love recording, I wsh I could make a career out of it.
     
  9. Subotnik

    Subotnik Please Stand By.

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    One of the advantages of making electronic music is that you generally tend to write and record in your own home at your own pace, so you can really sculpt things to get them exactly how you want them. The downside to that, especially in this modern era of ITB infinite undo/recall, is that if you're not careful you'll get obsessed with tweaking everything to the point that you suck all the life out of it and never actually finish a track. I prefer the 90s method of writing/recording all tweaks live through a desk to a DAW rather than automation, but that's because I spend enough time in front of computers as it is and would rather get hands-on than edit by mouse. Also I'm mainly a hardware guy and automation can be a pain in the ass with old analogue gear.

    One of the best things about EM production is that you can release different material under different names, depending on the output. You don't need to worry about fitting the track to the genre, you just write whatever you want and then put it out under whichever name suits it best.
     
  10. alfred p. sloan

    alfred p. sloan Well-Known Member

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    i understand working with electronics - there is great pleasure in the wild sounds you can make!
     
  11. Tigertrack

    Tigertrack Back In The Game!

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    I wanted to create music. A few years ago I was messing around with Sonic Foundry's Acid software. It was a great music creator, but all you were doing was just pasting a bunch of different loops together. It was great fun and I created some interesting songs. My music was pretty much techno-ish, electronic music of the weird kind. I even gave a name to my one-man, digital-band. Designed my own CD covers, and ripped my own CD's for my own personal enjoyment. I've been interested in Moog and wanted to play with one of his synthesizers.
    Always been interested in electronic music since the 80's.
     
  12. alfred p. sloan

    alfred p. sloan Well-Known Member

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    sounds like you are on the way, tigertrack!
     
  13. Tigertrack

    Tigertrack Back In The Game!

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    Oh, no! LOL! That was years ago, probably nine or so when I did that. Problem was I was getting bored with the loops that I had in my library and I had a shit load. Ton's and ton's of loops from various other companies. But most of my music started sounding the same and I got bored with it quickly. It was fun for a while though.
    I just wish I had the talent to actually play the music I hear in my head. I can come up with ton's of awesome stuff in my head, but it's bringing it out that's the hard part. I imagine my self playing all kinds of instruments, but when I put my fingers to the keyboard, it just doesn't work out for me. So, kind of gave up that hobby.

    And plus with having a Mac now, I don't know of too many good music-creating software that is loop-based.
     
  14. Subotnik

    Subotnik Please Stand By.

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    Ableton Live is really good for loop based music, but it's still a full featured DAW and has all the bells and whistles of a pro-level application. There are a ton of video tutorials on youtube that will teach you pretty much everything you need to know about how to use it.
     

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