Customs: Dry brushing vs. standard painting

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Jericho, Sep 7, 2010.

  1. Jericho

    Jericho Well-Known Member

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    I've been looking at a bunch of tutorials and figured I'd try it on this Cliffjumper repaint. So, I did it and eh, I'm not honestly seeing the benefit vs. standard paint.

    This is the final product of one such tutorial, other than the wings with some fade lines I don't see why one wouldn't just paint it silver straight up. Maybe I'm just doing it wrong???

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Hakka

    Hakka Well-Known Member

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    Is that pic taken with a flash? Looks very shiny.

    Here's a pic of my barricade, its drybrushed silver over matt black, just one shade of silver.

    [​IMG]

    If you put too much on or have your paint thinned too much it will look like normal painting.

    The best way is to use a few shades of silver, starting with the darker one. I've just done this on a Skywarp but dont have any pics. It really highlights the edges and details.

    Hakka.
     

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  3. Jericho

    Jericho Well-Known Member

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    Maybe I'm doing it wrong, do I want to cover the whole figure then and perhaps I should use the wide brush over the thinner one?

    I did it in spots and it actually looks like scuff marks, I kind of like my mess up :)  I'm using gun metal as the figure base and gray primer for the brush.
     
  4. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    The benefit of dry brushing as opposed to "standard painting" is simply to provide weathering to a figure.

    In the example you provided, the artist wanted to have the silver still look very weathered as opposed to only having a silver paint scheme on the figure. Also, dry brushing can give the illusion of texture to metal, even if most of the area is covered.
     
  5. Jericho

    Jericho Well-Known Member

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    Okay here's my attempt at it. I have a flash and non-flash version for ya. I actually like this even though I'm sure I did it wrong. It looks like wear and tear and that is okay with me.
     

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  6. Treadshot A1

    Treadshot A1 Or just 'A1' for short...

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    The left one looks right. That's the idea behind drybrushing. Wear and tear, without actual wear and tear.
     
  7. Jericho

    Jericho Well-Known Member

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    Oh, okay thanks. I saw that one tutorial with Megatron and then I seem to recall Jin's painting the whole figure using this method and I was getting confused. On to the next leg I guess!
     

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