Customs: Die-cast Vs. plastic models - ideal kitbash material?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by My03Tundra, Oct 29, 2007.

  1. My03Tundra

    My03Tundra LOVES TO EDIT POSTS!!

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    I have my own idea what I'm going to use for joints, and internal mechanics but for an outside body and source material it is a bit tougher. I know with plastic it would be easier to "weld" the joints and endoskeleton to the outside panels. But, with die cast it would be more durable and rugged once painted. That is a plus as I was considering once I did a few of my own customs to try one for someone else or to display it at work.

    I have a couple of die-cast cars already available, and most models I find are die-cast. I can find some plastic models, but I don't want to sacrifice anything in vehicle selection.

    One question I have with die-cast is how easy is it to join plastic parts to it? I ask because I have my latest find ready to be stripped down, retooled a bit (it is a CHEVY after all) repainted and assembled as a new Alternator style figure.
     
  2. REDLINE

    REDLINE longer days, plz? Veteran

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    its not really, plus if you screw up when you make your cuts, you're SOL. with plastic models, you can use putty to fix gaps or even plastiweld to repair small breaks and whatnot. I'd advise against it at least until you've become a seasoned veteran with this kind of customizing
     
  3. Kouri

    Kouri kupo

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    As far as I can tell, the only downside to metal is that it's difficult to cut and even more so to cut it into intricate shapes. Otherwise, there's no problem with using it. If you make an accidental cut, there are putty-like materials available to fill in the gaps that work very well, FIXIT Sculpt is a good option. As a matter of fact, that stuff will also solve your other problem - it bonds well to both metal and plastic and should allow you to join the die cast car parts to the plastic bot underneath.

    The biggest thing you'll want to watch out for, however, is bending the metal while working - it won't bounce back like plastics will. You'll probably want to remove any plastic parts from the model before touching the metal - a lot of the things you do to the metal can end up warping/melting the plastic pieces. If you intend to cut with a dremel (which I do recommend, as any type of razor, while more accurate, would take AGES to cut with), keep in mind that the metal will heat up from the friction of the grinding tool. This will make it easier to bend and may warp any plastic pieces still attached. Also, the paint on metals is really tough and will probably require a lacquer thinner to take the paint off - but that stuff will also eat away at plastic so be sure to clean the metal as thoroughly as possible before getting it anywhere near plastic pieces again.
     
  4. My03Tundra

    My03Tundra LOVES TO EDIT POSTS!!

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    For now, as a test, I have of all things a 1974 Chevy Vega Coupe in die-cast I'm going to straight customize. I had considered what you mentioned, Kouri, and even talked about it with a friend at work who has gotten me back into Hot Wheels and even customizing them! For the Vega I'm doing a LOT with the rear. I'm cutting off the flares and will be putting BIG tires in the rear. I'm also smoothing out the back end as well, and doing less on the front.

    For the engine, and interior, I plan on ripping parts right out of a donor Alternators Tracks. His seats, engine (LS2 engine in a Vega, OH YEAH!) possibly the dash (and steering wheel) and other Chevrolet parts. The rear seats are going to be cut out, and I plan on fabricating a rollcage for the interior out of small copper tubing.

    I've considered for a paint scheme a '70s red or black, with gold racing stripes. I'm going for a modern style Vega, but with a retro paint scheme.
     
  5. Ironhide2005

    Ironhide2005 PS3tag=DeaDPooLTFW

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    This is off-topic but MyO3Tundra I support your sig with brawn being in tf2
     
  6. plowking

    plowking I'm with ErechOveraker. Veteran

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    As others have said, plastic is more forgiving than metal, easier to work with, easier to cut, and unless you plan on handling it a lot, it should be pretty durable as long as you use a good glue....I use Devcon Plastic Weld....great stuff :thumb 

    And dont forget to show us that Vega when its done.... a buddy of mine had one when I was in school....he had a built 383 in it....man talk about a screamer!!...that little thing was QUICK!!
     
  7. My03Tundra

    My03Tundra LOVES TO EDIT POSTS!!

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    For the Vega, I need to get some metal files and figure out the BEST way (for me) to strip the body so I can repaint it. I'm set on a red paint job with a single racing stripe down the middle with a smaller one on each side like it had available back in the day. Right now it is black base, and has flames down the doors and hood.

    The mental image I have for it is a drag car with BIG tires in the rear, maybe a custom made sissy bar, and and interior rollcage.
     

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