Customs: Custom Headmaster Help

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by reluttr, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. reluttr

    reluttr Well-Known Member

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    I am in the process of making a very large and special "classics" headmaster. However I have hit a block, should I leave the neck on the head and use the magnet to attach the head to the body. Or should I cut out the neck and install a bionicle ball joint socket?

    On one hand I get a easy to remove headmaster that looks ascetically appealing. But on the other hand I could have a very pose-able head but sacrifice the nice looking neck and run the risk of the bionicle ball and socket breaking each time I transform him.

    What do you guys think?
     
  2. Altitron

    Altitron Commercial Artist

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    So... you're leaving the neck on the head but using a magnet? And if not a magnet, you're removing the neck and installing another neck?

    - Alty
     
  3. Treadshot A1

    Treadshot A1 Or just 'A1' for short...

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    Never heard of a bionicle ball joint breaking...
     
  4. Altitron

    Altitron Commercial Artist

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    I think he must mean breaking away from the point of installation, as if it were only going to be super-glued on in the place of what's already there... At least, that's what it sounds like?

    - Alty
     
  5. Treadshot A1

    Treadshot A1 Or just 'A1' for short...

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    Would it really be that hard to inset the post, though? All you have to do is drill a hole/socket that the post fits into snugly, and then superglue that. Much stronger, plus then sideways motion can't force the superglue joint to break.

    I used it on my Headmaster Scourge custom a while back, and while things have broken, it certainly wasn't the custom neck joint.
     
  6. reluttr

    reluttr Well-Known Member

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    well my main problem with using a ball joint is the kibble it adds on, but more than likely it would hold better. But like I said I would have to cut the neck off that's molded onto the head, because it would just look weird when the head is tilted up.

    Also I did mean the socket breaking, Ive had some of the newer bionicle sets break at the sockets when taking them apart and rearranging parts.
     
  7. Treadshot A1

    Treadshot A1 Or just 'A1' for short...

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    Well then, don't use bionicle joints. Use Asoblocks. They are much stronger.
     
  8. reluttr

    reluttr Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a recommended seller of asoblocks? because I believe they may be what I need.
     
  9. Treadshot A1

    Treadshot A1 Or just 'A1' for short...

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    Nope. To be honest, i got all my stock from my trip to Hong Kong, so i don't know where to get it online. I hear that they're not exactly well known toys, so you may need to search around.

    As for sets and which ones to buy, i wouldn't really give a damn. All of them are exactly the same, just hte quantity of each part is different. A basic set should do.

    Check the size of your custom first. Those joints are reasonably big, i'd say at least a centimeter diameter for the ball part. However, given you were going to use Bionicle joints, i'm guessing that ain't a problem.
     

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