Minor/Repaint: Custom Dropkick

Discussion in 'Radicons Customs' started by Ceerad, Aug 31, 2007.

  1. Ceerad

    Ceerad Well-Known Member

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  2. Xan7hos

    Xan7hos Member

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    Nope I have not. Love the facial details
     
  3. SupremeSancho

    SupremeSancho Member

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    Looks Good. Saw him in the store, but I passed on him got longarm instead.
     
  4. NIDARAM12

    NIDARAM12 Robot art guy

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    Drybrushing is like the new...... I dunno, but doesn't anyone have an airbrush or something? I'm starting to hate this fad.
     
  5. pscoop

    pscoop Dead inside

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    Looks nice, wish I had the talent or time to do stuff like that.
     
  6. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    Why are you so bitter about drybrushing? it's a key technique used for model and figure painting. It's as essential to repainting as primer on a car's new paint job. it's easy, and produces great effect. Would you honestly do a repaint, and NOT drybrush?
     
  7. timshinn73

    timshinn73 Well-Known Member

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    I have no comment on the custom in the link other than it's fine for the amount of work that looks to have gone into it.

    There's a difference between drybrushing and good drybrushing. There is a lot of the not so good variety floating around, I guess. Drybrushing on unpainted plastic does not make for a very nice looking effect, IMHO. Drybrushing is usually a step saved for later stages of model painting, not the first and only.

    I don't see it so much of a fad as much as one of many classic modeling techniques that look great when applied properly.
     
  8. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    I love drybrushing. It's THE key technique to bring out detail which will later be enhanced. I often put 3 levels of drybrushing on as well.
     
  9. NIDARAM12

    NIDARAM12 Robot art guy

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    I love good drybrushing too, I just think it looks off on alot of Transformers because they aren't very "gritty" designs, and often the smooth shiny car shell is left unpainted, which doesn't really go well with the drybrushed mechanicals imo. Or, some molds don't have enough detail to make it look great.


    It does work great on the military molds like Bonecrusher and Brawl though. But you just need to make sure to do the whole thing and not leave any glossy parts.

    I know most people here seem to just go with paint right to the plastic. Does anyone have any pics of a custom movie figure where the drybrushing was done over a black base coat? Just curious.

    And the reason I bring up airbrushing, is that you just never see it with Transformers customs. It's all spraypaint and hand brushing. I'm curious to see what a fine Max Watanabe-style paintjob would look like on a TF.
     
  10. QuinJester

    QuinJester T. Bison

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    Drybrushing is nice, and the stuff done on this model is very nice. The only thing that gets me with a lot of these customs is that everyone paints the insides and the metal parts... but almost noone repaints the exterior shell, leaving you with a realistic looking and detailed robot with very plastic-y car panels all over.

    The person who painted this very clearly has miniature painting experience, and is probably quite good at it too. If they had painted the outside of Dropkick as well it'd really look spectacular.
     
  11. timshinn73

    timshinn73 Well-Known Member

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    I have to agree here. Only painting parts of a very palstic looking toy just ends up looking half way finished.
     
  12. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    Actually, I've been thinking about this since I saw the film, and I don't really agree with the above - I think that leaving the vehicles pristine and drybrushing the robot modes is a nice and effective look, especially for the movie figures.

    The thing that's hard to grapple with is that, in their robot modes, the Autobots and Decepticons in the film accumulated damage - their vehicle forms became appropriately dinged up as the film went on. However, their robot forms - especially the "guts" which are not covered by morphed/folded vehicle parts - include a level of intricacy that's not always 100% translated over into the toy. Additionally, the movie had a whole lot of neat dynamic lighting available to light up these robot guts from different angles, giving the whole transformer an overall effect of being both ridiculously intricate and a smidge battle-worn.

    I think drybrushing does a good job of capturing both of those above effects. Dynamic lighting on molded plastic details is just that, and, honestly, I don't think it looks as dramatic, in the end, as drybrushing or detailing those molded detail areas so that they show off the toy's mold. It adds the look of dynamic lighting to the toys. (Glosscoat, in my opinion, adds the other necessary "look.")

    Pan it if you want, but I think it looks fantastic on Transformers, when used in moderation with other styles of detailing.
     
  13. NIDARAM12

    NIDARAM12 Robot art guy

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    Personally, I'd sometimes rather just see a wash than all that drybrushing. That mix of fresh toyish plastic and gritty McFarlane-style painting is off-puttin to me, like a blending of two styles that don't always go together when placed face-to-face.

    Drybrushing can be overdone sometimes because its definitely a quick and easy way to "bring out the details" and the results are pretty cool for minimal effort. However, the look can beless than subtle. I mean, look at a good Warhammer 40k paintjob for comparison, it wont have that streaky, stroke-y look.

    Drybrushing is one of those things that can go either way. I just don't think Transformers are the best candidates for that look, unless again they are the military molds or something really metallic and detailed like Jin's protoforms.

    Not to mention it always works best with a nice base coat of dark grey or black or some other color to cover up the bare plastic. :) 
     
  14. encline

    encline customizer of love TFW2005 Supporter

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    And the reason I bring up airbrushing, is that you just never see it with Transformers customs. It's all spraypaint and hand brushing. I'm curious to see what a fine Max Watanabe-style paintjob would look like on a TF.[/QUOTE]

    Most of my Transformers are airbrushed. You can to to my website @ web.mac.com/enclinedesigns, or look at http://www.tfw2005.com/boards/showthread.php?t=148369

    But there is only so much that can be done with an airbrush. What is Max Wantabe-style paintjob? Just wondering?
     
  15. Nightwind

    Nightwind Aka Dusty Bottoms.

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    I think that drybrushing has become so popular recently just because it does work so well with the movie style figures. These character designs were created specifically to have a more realistic feel which works well with this paint technique. I definitely would not recommend someone doing this with a TF from any of the other lines. I also think it's become pretty popular just because it is so easy to do! I'm not artistically talented in any way. I even have a difficult time putting complementary colors together. So drybrushing my movie figures and having them look so nice after gives me a personal sense of satisfaction that I probably can't get through any other repaint/kitbash attempts that I may make.

    I just want to say that I really enjoy all of the work that I've seen in this section of TFW2005! I'm constantly amazed at the quality of work that the members in this forum produce!
     
  16. Chaos Convoy

    Chaos Convoy Dai Gurren-Dan member

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    See, I'm in the same mind as Nightwind, here. I think drybrushing and paintwashing looks horrible on other TF lines. I agree with you, NIDARAM, that most TFs lines aren't "gritty." They're meant to look nice and blocky and pretty pristine. But guess what? The movie line DOES have gritty designs. The movie designs are so intricate and detailed that drybrushing and paintwashing is nigh on necessary for the toys not to look like crap. It also helps the toys look a lot more like their onscreen counterparts. And you can't honestly tell me that leaving them as they are, straight out of the package, is better than painting them up, no matter how slightly.

    I'm not a fan of drybrushing or paintwashing vehicle mode parts, though. It makes the vehicles look like they're beat to hell when they shouldn't be (unless it's Bumblebee as he looked in the beginning of the movie). And drybrushing the robot mode parts doesn't necessarily make the robot look like it's beat to hell either. I just see it as a way to bring out robot mode details that are really very lacking and wouldn't be seen otherwise.

    And not everyone has an airbrush, no. They're A LOT more expensive than a good ol' bottle of paint and a brush and take more skill to use as well. And some people don't like how airbrushing looks. I, for one, can't stand airbrushing on tfs. Hell, I don't really like it on toys, period. I think it looks bad unless it's some intricate detailed mural. I think the work encline does is very good. But as for like, shading for panels and parts? No way. The way it looks makes me think of bad '80s anime. I see airbrushing as a way to detail figures or toys that don't have sculpted-in detail anyway. In the case with TFs, especially the movie toys, that's totally not the case. They have more detailing than probably any previous line short of Alternators or Masterpieces.

    But yeah..my point is that I'd rather have something than nothing at all, as far as detailing is concerned. I don't see how anyone can have a gripe with that.
     
  17. encline

    encline customizer of love TFW2005 Supporter

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    Thank you. I airbrushed all the ground work. There is no way to achieve some effects with out an airbrush. The detail on the movie figures have so much potential. I did a lot of dry brushing to help with highlights and shadows.
     
  18. JinSaotome

    JinSaotome Banned

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    Check my customs out. All of them have a basecoat of black or dark gunmetal before the dryrbushing. That makes all the difference in the world for sheen and durability. You get a much better look if you basecoat the plastic.

    What people need to star doing, those who haven't yet, is apply a wash after/before certain drybrush steps to bring everything together and add highlights to even the dryrbushed areas. Don't stick with black and silver dryrbushing. Use a wash of gunmetal and then drybrush over that with Argent Silver to give the metal a real 3D look. It helps round out the tone and removes brushmarks. The more you go over a figure, the better it looks.
     
  19. timshinn73

    timshinn73 Well-Known Member

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    Bingo!
     
  20. NIDARAM12

    NIDARAM12 Robot art guy

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    Sorry, but I most definitely can. Thats all a matter of taste. I love the fresh clean look that they have out of the package. Sure, I'd love for them to be fully painted and shaded like a Japanese model or something, but I'd rather have the factory clean look than the hand-brushed look.

    But I think that most if not all of the movie figures stand out great on their own... as toy robots they look really slick.

    On a related but side note I also prefer American MSIA figures, or the newer Japanese releases that aren't covered in black panel lines.

    If you ask me, alot of people are ruining great looking toys by rushing to brush the metallic paint all over them. :cry  But thats just a matter of personal aesthetic taste :wink: 

    I'd rather have "nothing" than "something" that isn't really my thing. I don't like messing with my toys, and in most cases I just don't think the methods of "bringing out the details" look good at all on Transformers. But I do love Jin's Protoforms :dj 
     

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