Customs: Creating custom packaging

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by sodawilly, Oct 15, 2005.

  1. sodawilly

    sodawilly Old School fan since 1984 TFW2005 Supporter

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    I have a few Adobe programs, but I am wanting to get into designing custom packaging for my Binaltech Kitbashes. I am basically wanting to know what is the easiest program to use for designing a box layout, and also what is the easiest way to go about doing it. Some programs I have at my disposal are Adobe Photoshop and also Adobe Illustrator. Any help would be fantastic! :thumbs2: 

    Thank you in advance to whomever might be able to help,

    -Gregg
     
  2. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    I also have a lot of Adobe programs (namely Photoshop), and I have found those to be the best for me. I was in a graphic design program in college at one time and package design was my bread and butter there. Typically, I used Photoshop to design my projects. However, I haven't designed any BT and/or Alt-style packages (yet). I know how to do it; I just don't have the templates, fonts, etc. I also would like to get into this in the future, but I only have time to make what custom Alts I do right now. Lol, I think I would be satisfied right now just to do the character art for my customs.

    I know Sureshot over at TFans.com has designed quite a few Commemorative Series packages. He does good work. You could also check with him as well.
     
  3. sodawilly

    sodawilly Old School fan since 1984 TFW2005 Supporter

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    Thanks for the reply. I have the full measurements for a Binaltech box to be made, but I am unsure of exactly how to lay it out in "open" box format so I can create the file and send it to a printer to be made so I can cut it out and do the glueing and such to finish off the box. Do I need to create a massive JPG that fits all the windows of each corner of box and then apply them to the massive base and merge them with it? Let me know. I am getting good with Photoshop, but do not know all the ins and outs yet.

    -Gregg
     
  4. RHansen

    RHansen Sir. Ranbotnic Veteran

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    you would need a big printer and a big file size is my guess, because they are all one piece of cardboard glued into a box shape, I could assemble the "open box" shape for you, if you supplied me with the pictures of the sides, front, back, top bottom etc, but getting them printed is the hard part
     
  5. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Printing a file of this size is a matter of taking it to a local print shop, giving them the file, explaining it is your own creation and you are not making a profit on it (there are copyright laws to play with here), them printing it, and picking up the finished piece and paying for it.

    However, another alternative is taking your design, splitting it up into managable pieces (no bigger than 8 X 11 pieces because of desktop printer limitations), printing it, and then reassembling it.

    There are pros and cons to each method: while getting a file printed at a local print shop is the "professional" way to do it, you don't know what it will look like until it is actually printed. Often times what is seen on the screen doesn't exactly match up with what comes out of the printer and into reality. With a print shop, you're stuck with what they give you, or you keep printing until you have what you want (which turns into mucho $$$). With printing at home, you can do what you want with this problem, printing as many times as need be with a much smaller cost. However, the con here is the limitation of the print size of your printer. Piecing a project like this isn't fun to do and doesn't always turn out as planned.

    Hope this helps! :D 
     
  6. sodawilly

    sodawilly Old School fan since 1984 TFW2005 Supporter

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    Thanks for the info.....For each one I complete, I will indeed be going to a professional printer to accomplish my tasks.......All my boxes I create will also have the window treatment. On another note, these boxes will indeed be only for my collection and as such are for my enjoyment as a kitbasher and collector. I may however offer down the road custom boxes for people.......But that is a long ways off.

    Thanks again,

    -Gregg
     
  7. Chaos Incarnate

    Chaos Incarnate Not just a name.

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    Coming from someone who is a graphics designer and all around prepress director, this is the advice I have. For maximum clarity and minimum file size, I'd set up the vector graphics in Illustrator, like the background grid, tech specs, etc, if you're doing that. The boxart, photos, and whatnot I'd setup in Photoshop, at least 600dpi, and export them as PDFs. Then I'd set the whole thing up in InDesign. Be sure to build it with proper tic marks and at least, though not much more than, 1/8th inch bleed. Be sure to Preflight the .indd file before you take it to the printer. Then I'd run it on nothing lighter than 100# C1S paper. And see if they can score it as well, otherwise it will tear when you fold it.

    So, to sum up, Illustrator for vector, Photoshop for raster, InDesign for setup. Preflighting is very very important. Make sure that it's on glossy cardstock. Oh, and make sure that the print shop has a wide-format printer. It's waaay too expensive to run on a press, and a regular printer won't go over 12"x18"
     
  8. lastmaximal

    lastmaximal Hellspark

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