Customs: Combiner joint attachment tutorial?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by mrclean08, Dec 24, 2008.

  1. mrclean08

    mrclean08 G1 FOR LIFE

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    In seeing so many of the great custom combiners on here (Devastator, Predaking, Defensor, etc.), I was wondering if there are any tutorials on how to attach the limbs together.

    I know people use Bionicle, Lego Knights, etc., but can someone point me in the right direction in detail on how to actually connect the limbs together? Are there any tutorials out there with pics? Anyone's help is greatly appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. Nemesis Predaking

    Nemesis Predaking Offical Enforcer WTF@TFW Veteran

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    Seems to be a closely guarded secret, I think you got to kill somebody to be able to find out.
     
  3. Sideways

    Sideways Banned

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    I for one would.

    *just kidding.
     
  4. Lintlizard

    Lintlizard Active Member

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    It all depends on WHO I'd have to kill. *suspicious glances*
     
  5. mrclean08

    mrclean08 G1 FOR LIFE

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    Are the Lego Knight Kingdom toys still in production?
     
  6. MoeSizzlac

    MoeSizzlac Newb Customizer

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    Each combiner uses something different. I have used 3 differenc methods on 3 different combiners. I can help you better if you let me know which ones you're combining together. I will say overall, I like using Kid Knex parts because it creates a good bond and can be held in with a screw for the post and glue for the socket. Only problem is there is a lot less articulation with Kid Knex vs. neo shifters and lego knights.
     
  7. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    I am actually building a tutorial on this topic now. It has step-by-step pics for the process. In the meantime, I recommend never just using plastic on plastic joints. They must always be reinforced using screw / bolt / nut hardware. There is no glue I've ever come across that can be applied on a 1/2 inch area and hold the wear and weight of several times it's weight.
     
  8. cefuroxx

    cefuroxx Well-Known Member

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    you try JB weld Plastic Welder??? That stuff is the sickness!
     
  9. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    yep, I've tried it many times. It's great stuff, especially when 75% or closer to dry - it becomes almost moldable like clay. However on most bare/properly prepped plastic, with enough resistance, will snap right off.
     
  10. SMOG

    SMOG Vocab-champion ArgueTitan

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    Less to do with joints, and more to do with glue-like things, I have to say that Shoe Goo is one of my wonder drug.

    For those that don't know, it's a clear shoe-repair gel that hardens over a roughly a day. I've tried other brands, like Kiwi's shoe repair gel, but without question the Shoe Goo brand name variety has given me the best results.

    This is not generally for finesse work though... it's messy, and works best when it's gobbed on. It's great for parts that need to be securely attached on the inside or underside of figures. Stuff I figured would never go back together has been saved with Shoe Goo. In the past I've even used it to solidly attach chunks of broken concrete to vertical planks (art school project, don't ask :)  ) so it's strong.

    It goes on like a sticky gel, and has a sort of rubbery consistency as it dries. This is one of it's greatest features, because when fully dry it's tough as hell, but not brittle at all. You'll never have anything just suddenly break off or give out with Shoe Goo... only a sustained, deliberate show of force could tear a part out of it's grasp. Depending on how you use it, you can have parts that allow for a little "give", or you can have them rock solid.

    On the downside:
    -takes a day to fully cure, though it starts to take hold after 10 minutes or so
    -rubbery consistency makes it un-sandable (though you can carve it away)
    -a bit messy (though it is clear and colourless)

    zmog
     
  11. Sound Blaster

    Sound Blaster Shattered Glass World

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    :lol  That is so true you known we used to share info back in the day...But i guess now it more like....:bowdown: 


     
  12. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    Well, to be honest, everyone who's made a gestalt has shared the basic fundamentals about what they've used for connectors. More recently several of us feel the need to be slightly protective of "secrets"
    It's a matter of searching for the answer in Radicons. I know my menasor WIP thread had extensive details about the connector types used.
     
  13. cefuroxx

    cefuroxx Well-Known Member

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    why do people feel the need to be protective?
     
  14. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Awesome.

    This explains a lot. :lol 

    :poke 

    There have been several instances of theft among customizers, especially as of late. Many of the artists here work really hard to pioneer ideas, only to have someone else attempt to take the credit for them and/or cash in on another artist's work, either without permission and/or an attempt to compensate the original artist. That's not the best practice in the world, I'd simply say.
     
  15. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    Well, it's hard to say why.
    Personally, if a trick or technique is sometimes publicly shared, then publicly sold, the value of the original might decline, or the market might get milked out because somethign that looked hard to do, wasn't as difficult because there are instructions online. While it's awesome to have an idea or technique that people have desire to learn, it's sometimes disheartening to see the idea used for the different reasons.
     
  16. SmokescreenSWE

    SmokescreenSWE Well-Known Member

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    Well, this community has taught me loads of new techniques that have made my stuff better, stuff that I wouldn't have figured out myself. PVC scratch building, pin removal, the joys of rare earth magnets... but I understand if certain specific tricks are kept away. There's also the neat thing of getting the idea but not being told exactly how: you might figure out an ever better way to do it instead of simply aping the existing one.
     
  17. frenzyrumble

    frenzyrumble Banned

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    well, i think the ideas have been shared (ie Lego knights, bionicles, neo-shifters) but the details have been kept a little more quite. It's fun and challenging to figure out where and what to do with the joints. I honestly can say, every connection on every gestalt I've done is completely different than the next one. You need to take into consideration the surface, where it falls on bot and alt mode, how the weight of the joint will effect the bot mode, and how the weight of the part connected will effect the gestalt. Also, consider the stress and weight factors overall on that particular joint. an ankle connection needs to hold up sometimes 10 pounds of plastic, while one that holds on a hand or head can be much less strong.
     
  18. ErechOveraker

    ErechOveraker I'm with Plowking.

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    "Back in the day" like what, yesterday?

    There is plenty of info shared here, everyday, by all members. What you've always seemed to expect though are super-detailed, Betty Crocker level-esque recipes made out just for you so you don't have to do any legwork at all on a 'bash. It's just not feasible for anyone to do that, or even fair for you to have a chip on your shoulder about it if people aren't spending their free time doing it either. I know there are a few of those type of tutorials out there (like Jaf's awesome MP Jazz), but they all require a certain level of skill, and plenty of trial and error along the way to complete too. The info for making combiner joints is already out here, if you're willing to put in the time to read and test ideas out, so I'm not really sure what more you think you deserve or why you'd post something so divisive...?

    Posts like yours are the opposite of what Radicons is about, and if you really feel that way, then you're hanging out in a different forum than I am (and probably the rest of us, too). :2c: 
     
  19. mrclean08

    mrclean08 G1 FOR LIFE

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    I can't wait!! Your dry-brushing technique tutorial on your website was A-1 excellence! I was able to bring new life into my TF movie figures. All my friends love looking at them on my shelf. Will you be posting the combiner joint tutorial also on your website or here in the Radicons tutorial section?
     

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