Customs: Coldcast repair

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Bryan, Oct 28, 2006.

  1. Bryan

    Bryan ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2005
    Posts:
    9,020
    Trophy Points:
    211
    Likes:
    +0
    Bought a Shockwave Palisades statue with a busted leg (below). The peg that attached the two broke pretty cleanly, and I can hold it together with no visible damage. But I'm not sure what glue/cement/etc. to use on whatever coldcast statues are made from.

    Any guidance? Thanks much...

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Sidecutter

    Sidecutter Evil Dealer Scum TFW2005 Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2004
    Posts:
    5,098
    News Credits:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    272
    Likes:
    +41
    In my experience, good on cyanoacrylite, A.K.A. Superglue, does great, as these are basically cast resin, and resin is a plastic. You may want to try a plastic specific pack of stuff, but otherwise, a very small amount of standard superglue, carefully applied (we're talking a nearly invisible layer of it, not close enough to the edges to squish out when the parts are pressed together) should give you an invisible or nearly invisible repair. Just apply, press the parts together, and hold them firmly in place for a minute or two.

    Part of the reson this works is that resin tends to have a texture when it breaks, whichs helps the glue do it's job.
     
  3. MegaMoonMan

    MegaMoonMan www.megamoonman.com TFW2005 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Posts:
    17,235
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    322
    Likes:
    +29
    Ebay:
    YouTube:
    Something I've found that works better than any glue is JB Weld. They use it to bond broken metal parts together, but it works just as well on plastic. I've tried it on parts that glue just won't seem to hold, and it works wonders. Use the quick setting kind.
     
  4. PsyckoSama

    PsyckoSama Profressional Asshole

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2004
    Posts:
    115
    Trophy Points:
    91
    Likes:
    +0
    Before you glue it, with something that large and on a load bareing spot like that, I recomend you drill a hole in both sides and pin with with a short piece of steel rod to give it more strength.
     
  5. Bryan

    Bryan ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2005
    Posts:
    9,020
    Trophy Points:
    211
    Likes:
    +0
    Thanks again to you guys...I'll give it a whirl next week and let you know how it works out.
     
  6. convoymagnus

    convoymagnus Yeshua Is Mashiach.

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Posts:
    542
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Likes:
    +0
    Ebay:
    Just a little word:

    usually they use polyester resin mixed with fillers to make this statues, if this is the same to this statue (feel if the material is the same that is used with those chinese ornaments like little angels or dolls) if it is so you can buy a resin in the home depot (fiberglass resin) mix a little resin with catalist and use it as a glue put it in between pieces and hold pieces together (around 20 minutes, let stand overnight for total cure), the benefits of this over any other kind of glue is that resin with resin becomes one piece so adhesion will be better. i used to do this when pieces used to get broken before working with poliurethane resin.

    hope it works.
     
  7. MegaMoonMan

    MegaMoonMan www.megamoonman.com TFW2005 Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Posts:
    17,235
    News Credits:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    322
    Likes:
    +29
    Ebay:
    YouTube:
    Drilling and pinning is the best answer, but not always necessary for a statue that is never handled.
     
  8. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Posts:
    11,549
    Trophy Points:
    236
    Likes:
    +0
    Ebay:
    The superglue will work pretty good; if you can find any "Zap-A-Gap" (which I THINK is the name they use for it at Hobby Lobby or Hobbytown USA) then you'll be all right. However, I second the use of the JB weld. I haven't used it for resin material, but it does stick within a short time to metal and vacuum-formed plastic.
     
  9. fschuler

    fschuler Member TFW2005 Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Posts:
    2,202
    Trophy Points:
    216
    Likes:
    +0
    I agree with you pin-it and stick-it guys. Even if you don't plan to play with it/handle it, my experience says that most glues, when used in an area of high stress, will eventually let go. I recommend using a good stiff steel pin that is knurled on the ends (has a diamond shaped pattern or is at least roughened using a grinding tool or very coarse sandpaper).
     

Share This Page