Cold weather TF handling practices

Discussion in 'Transformers Toy Discussion' started by grimlock1972, Jan 1, 2010.

  1. grimlock1972

    grimlock1972 "No Mas" My Wallet

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    this is mainly targeted to those of us who live in the northern US ( Like me) and Canada or else where where winter temps drop way below freezing.


    I am wonder what if any practices you put in place when bringing in a new Transformer(s) that has either been in the back of a delivery truck and exposed to cold temps or from the trunk of your own vehicle where it has been exposed to cold temps.

    for me if the figure has no electronics or die cast i let it set for 30 minutes to warm up it up before transforming it

    If it has Diecast but no electronics I let it sit for 45 minutes to warm up.

    If it does have electronics i give it a full hour to warm up.

    not sure if it is really needed but i feel better safe than sorry
    so does any one else do anything like i do?
     
  2. Matty

    Matty @StayingInTheBox Moderator News Staff

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    I lived in Flagstaff, Arizona for about 16 years and it can get pretty cold during the winter (below freezing on a daily basis). I have never experienced anything to make me wanna warm up my transformers before messing around with them for safety reasons.

    You bring up an interesting point though. I wonder if a figure can be weakened from tempature changes.
     
  3. grimlock1972

    grimlock1972 "No Mas" My Wallet

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    I have always been told that Plastic can get brittle when its cold so i choose to take no chances
     
  4. Moonscream

    Moonscream YES, We EXIST!

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    Considering that farms continue to use PVC pipes and plastic buckets, etc, in sheds, barns and outside when its sub 0, winter athletes use boots and other equipment that's made out of plastics, as does your car, etc, etc...that's not really true. The trouble comes when ice accumulates inside and breaks it by expanding, or if massive amounts of snow are allowed to accumulate on top of an empty container.

    A toy in a box that provides protection and insulation, in a truck that has to have a heater for the driver at least won't have that problem, unless the box is dropped on a stoop outside and left for hours in snow.

    --Moony
     
  5. Dran0n

    Dran0n Junk male

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    I do not do that.

    Do feel it's necessary.
     
  6. tusko

    tusko Well-Known Member

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    I've never had a temperature related issue with my TFs.

    Once I tried putting the thing in the freezer, in hopes the adhesive in the packaging would be easier to remove but it did nothing.

    I wouldn't worry about it.
     
  7. thenatureboywoo

    thenatureboywoo Veteran

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    I let my Tf's get to room temperature if they have been out in the cold. Plastic does in fact get brittle if it really cold. My friends birt bike had the back fender break off just from the shock/vibration of landing last year at a race. The temp was between 5 and 10 degrees i think he said.
     
  8. ryan.j

    ryan.j Well-Known Member

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    i've had that happen on my 2stroke MX bike just from the vibrations working an already stressed mudguard over a long time - dunno how much temperature has to do with it though, i think chucking the bike a few times played a bigger part :F
     
  9. thenatureboywoo

    thenatureboywoo Veteran

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    The plastics were actually only a couple months old. He bought a new set for his graphics kit. He didn't feel like getting rid of the old graphics, so he ran two sets of plastic. Usually plastic on dirt bikes will become really floppy over time, not break.
     
  10. brr-icy

    brr-icy G1 Collector

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    i have had them break when cold twice, both times it was translucent plastic, i don't tf them when they are cold anymore
     
  11. KremzeekTyCobb

    KremzeekTyCobb Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't take any chances, especially with G1 stuff. Sounds like a good idea.
     
  12. Dran0n

    Dran0n Junk male

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    I took MP Skywarp (U.S.) outside today. Just above freezing!

    So, I don't really practice that.
     

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