Customs: CAD Modelling Soundwave's Head

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by pilotmaster70, Apr 8, 2017.

  1. pilotmaster70

    pilotmaster70 Space Nerd

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    Does anyone know how I would go about modelling a Soundwave head for printing? Also if anyone knows how to model a ball joint (specifically the socket) in Autodesk Fusion 360 some help would be appreciated.
     
  2. DJ kevintron

    DJ kevintron Well-Known Member

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    The socket and ball should be the same size. So lets say your Soundwave is head is a basic cube. You make the neck out of a cylinder and then place a sphere on top. Ok now make another sphere the same size. Move that sphere so its under the cube. Then move the sphere so more than half is inside the cube. Now use the extrude command(i dont know the exact name of the command in your software) to delete that sphere and the space it was in. That's the socket. Thats the very basic of it. The tricky part is figuring how far into the cube the extruded sphere goes. Too little it wont stay on the ball joint. Too much and you cant get the ball joint into the socket. This is what im struggling with in my models so if anyone has tips Im interested too.
     
  3. Big Hache

    Big Hache Well-Known Member

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    I would suggest studying ball joints on existing figures you have, dissect and analyze.

    You'll notice there is a hole on the opposite side of the socket. I believe that's there to give flex for inserting/removing the ball. You should also see small protrusions just inside the socket walls which is what holds the ball in.

    It is a science to get them right, but not impossible.
     
  4. Rodentus prime

    Rodentus prime Well-Known Member

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    I copied the balljoints used in this for reference - it came from an app called tinkerplay for making 3d printable toys (now sadly discontinued)
    13718541_10209521988677448_5048804091845074891_n.jpg balljoint.jpg

    I assumed that hole was to allow airflow so you don't get a vacuum holding the joint together when trying to take it apart.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2017
  5. Reichstein

    Reichstein Well-Known Member

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    If you create an account on tinkercad (web based 3D design utility) you can use their ball joints by placing them into a project and exporting them to your pc.
    The ball joints are in tinkercads side menu under connectors I think.

    I used tinkercad to make an entire transformer, came out pretty well. I would suggest printing the ball joint upright, I had issues with them when I printed them on much of an angle.
     

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