Customs: Body color on 'bots

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Jericho, Feb 14, 2011.

  1. Jericho

    Jericho Well-Known Member

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    So I finally finished my Cliffjumper repaint (pics to come) and i did a 'gun metal' (testors model master acrylic) on all exposed parts then went and did a couple dry brushings here and there with 'aluminum' to give it some wear and tear. Looking at most every 'bot here I realize I may have done that backwards. Should I use the 'aluminum' on the body and then do the dry brush with the 'gun metal'? Or, is there a better color to use for the body than what I have right now?

    I also have 'grey primer' in my stash right now.
     
  2. OMEGAPRIME1983

    OMEGAPRIME1983 Well-Known Member

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    No, you did it right, you dry brush your lighter colors over dark bases. You're good to go man :thumb 
     
  3. Jericho

    Jericho Well-Known Member

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    Phew, thanks! Other than learning that spray paint is much, MUCH better to use on the body this was my biggest concern.

    I'll put my finished product up tomorrow morning. I'm amazed at how stunning a quick two coats of spray looks vs. brushing on and on and on.
     
  4. Treadshot A1

    Treadshot A1 Or just 'A1' for short...

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    Technically, that's not true. While the general way is to do a dark base followed by a light drybrush, you can get great effects the opposite way as well. For example, my Nemesis Stryker has a red base with black drybrushed on it, and your eyes can actually pick up that the red is underneath. It creates a nice effect where the red looks like it's seeping out from inside.

    Of course, it's all up to you. There's really no right or wrong way to do drybrushing, just whatever you feel is good. :) 
     
  5. Ramrider

    Ramrider TF Art Lad

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    This is true. You can quite easily drybrush dark onto light, and indeed it may well look great. Generally, though, the advice, particularly for the likes of weathered metals, is to start with a dark basecoat and drybrush with progressively lighter shades, applying a little less paint on each pass so you're not obliterating what you've already applied.
     

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