Customs: Blackwashing, what is the technique?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by funkatron101, Jul 11, 2007.

  1. funkatron101

    funkatron101 TFW2005 Supporter

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    What is the best technique for giving that blackwashed look, like Jin Saotome's Transformers customs?
     
  2. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    This is one of the posts I made in the Exhaustive Kitbasher's thread a few months back; most of what I was planning to type up is still there:

    Linky

    EDIT: One of the things I didn't add to that thread, though, was that it's usually a good idea to go really light on the black wetwashing the first time around, dab off whatever areas you don't want with a paper towel, let the paint dry, then go again. Repeated washes in the same area, combined with toweling off the excess, leads to some really crisp and clear panel lines and shadowing in nooks & crannies.
     
  3. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    This is one of the posts I made in the Exhaustive Kitbasher's thread a few months back; most of what I was planning to type up is still there:

    Linky

    EDIT: One of the things I didn't add to that thread, though, was that it's usually a good idea to go really light on the black wetwashing the first time around, dab off whatever areas you don't want with a paper towel, let the paint dry, then go again. Repeated washes in the same area, combined with toweling off the excess, leads to some really crisp and clear panel lines and shadowing in nooks & crannies.
     
  4. funkatron101

    funkatron101 TFW2005 Supporter

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    Ah, I must have missed that page. That thread was getting large.
     
  5. funkatron101

    funkatron101 TFW2005 Supporter

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    Ah, I must have missed that page. That thread was getting large.
     
  6. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    I know some of the folks on here use enamel thinner and black enamel paint to do their wetwashing, but I haven't done it in a loooooooong time - not since, like, the early '90s. I just don't trust the speed at which enamels dry.

    If the technique is any different, I leave it to the other folks who use enamels & thinner for wetwashing to drop the knowledge bomb.
     
  7. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    I know some of the folks on here use enamel thinner and black enamel paint to do their wetwashing, but I haven't done it in a loooooooong time - not since, like, the early '90s. I just don't trust the speed at which enamels dry.

    If the technique is any different, I leave it to the other folks who use enamels & thinner for wetwashing to drop the knowledge bomb.
     
  8. SPLIT LIP

    SPLIT LIP Dry built

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    Thanks Op's! I've been looking for a thread on that technique but never knew yours had it.:thumb 
     
  9. SPLIT LIP

    SPLIT LIP Dry built

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    Thanks Op's! I've been looking for a thread on that technique but never knew yours had it.:thumb 
     
  10. Greyryder

    Greyryder Kitbashed

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    Instead of an inkwash, you could try an oil wash. I've found that using water soluable oil paints makes it very easy to control the darkness of the wash. The down side is that the process itself can be a bit messy, and it has to be sealed with a clear coat.

    I think the oil paint down enough that I can easily brush it on, and work it into the details. Once it's painted on, and I've cleaned my brush, I can start wiping the oil paint off with a paper towel. I can take it back as much or as little as I want, and if I don't like it, I can just wash it off. Once I'm happy with it, I let it sit overnight, and clear coat it.

    I've found that matte finishes will take a nice patina from the oil paint, and that glossy surfaces don't. A damp paer towel will take the patina off, if you don't like it.

    Remember, you want water soluable oil paints. The ones I have are labeled as "water mixable." Regular oil paints require mineral spirits to thin, and that can attack underlying paint. The "proper" way to do oil washes involves standard oil paints, and mineral spirit, But, I've found that my method is pretty well goof proof, since it can be cleaned off, without hurting any other paint.
     
  11. Greyryder

    Greyryder Kitbashed

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    Instead of an inkwash, you could try an oil wash. I've found that using water soluable oil paints makes it very easy to control the darkness of the wash. The down side is that the process itself can be a bit messy, and it has to be sealed with a clear coat.

    I think the oil paint down enough that I can easily brush it on, and work it into the details. Once it's painted on, and I've cleaned my brush, I can start wiping the oil paint off with a paper towel. I can take it back as much or as little as I want, and if I don't like it, I can just wash it off. Once I'm happy with it, I let it sit overnight, and clear coat it.

    I've found that matte finishes will take a nice patina from the oil paint, and that glossy surfaces don't. A damp paer towel will take the patina off, if you don't like it.

    Remember, you want water soluable oil paints. The ones I have are labeled as "water mixable." Regular oil paints require mineral spirits to thin, and that can attack underlying paint. The "proper" way to do oil washes involves standard oil paints, and mineral spirit, But, I've found that my method is pretty well goof proof, since it can be cleaned off, without hurting any other paint.
     
  12. Boggs6ft7

    Boggs6ft7 TFW2005 Supporter

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    For panel lines, I use flat black enamel paint and paint thinner. I usually do a 50/50 mix in a small dish or a spray paint cap. I let the paint soak into the brush and then touch the very tip of the brush to one of the lines. Capillary action does the rest. Then I clean up the areas where I touched the brush to the lines.

    It helps to clear coat the object first or use a base coat that doesn't react with paint thinner.
     
  13. Boggs6ft7

    Boggs6ft7 TFW2005 Supporter

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    For panel lines, I use flat black enamel paint and paint thinner. I usually do a 50/50 mix in a small dish or a spray paint cap. I let the paint soak into the brush and then touch the very tip of the brush to one of the lines. Capillary action does the rest. Then I clean up the areas where I touched the brush to the lines.

    It helps to clear coat the object first or use a base coat that doesn't react with paint thinner.
     
  14. Driftbot

    Driftbot Well-Known Member

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    i do the same as boggs, but i soak the brush in thinner, then dab the tip into the black paint on a seperate "palette" so i dont ruin the whole bottle of black.
    capillary action rules. :thumb 
    i did this for the very first time to my movie '77 BB last week. didnt even read up on it, just went with instinct. its not very hard.
    go for it!

    btw jin also used lots of drybrushing for the metallic look. for that you just get your brush wet with desired color, wipe it off so there is hardly any paint left on there, and go over the area lightly. if you are doing it right you will hardly get any paint off the brush onto your project and you may need to repeat a few times to get the look you are going for.

    there was a good article on this stuff in toyfare a while ago. it was the one where they did the custom 101 marvel legend Knight guy. (sorry i forgot the character's name... i have the magazine at home.)
     
  15. Driftbot

    Driftbot Well-Known Member

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    i do the same as boggs, but i soak the brush in thinner, then dab the tip into the black paint on a seperate "palette" so i dont ruin the whole bottle of black.
    capillary action rules. :thumb 
    i did this for the very first time to my movie '77 BB last week. didnt even read up on it, just went with instinct. its not very hard.
    go for it!

    btw jin also used lots of drybrushing for the metallic look. for that you just get your brush wet with desired color, wipe it off so there is hardly any paint left on there, and go over the area lightly. if you are doing it right you will hardly get any paint off the brush onto your project and you may need to repeat a few times to get the look you are going for.

    there was a good article on this stuff in toyfare a while ago. it was the one where they did the custom 101 marvel legend Knight guy. (sorry i forgot the character's name... i have the magazine at home.)
     

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