Customs: "Black Wash"???????

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by godspeed, Dec 1, 2009.

  1. godspeed

    godspeed (Dead)Head Master

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    Hey radicons, I have heard mention of the "black wash" as a way to bring out the molded detail in figures (such as ROTF leader prime). I see these beautiful custom paint jobs that I could never pull off, but a simple treatment to bring out detail I could do. Can anyone drop some knowledge on the process and help a brotha out?
     

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  2. red4

    red4 Banned

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    Dilute some black acrylic modeler's paint with about 2/5 water. Brush on lightly. Lightly wipe off excess that gets on elevated details; if you press too hard, you'll wipe off the paint that sinks down into the crevices - that paint needs to stay in the crevices for the highlighting to work.
     
  3. Tom_Servo

    Tom_Servo Well-read chick magnet

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    Diluted paint is usually good, but depending on the surface, I sometimes use regular thickness paint. If the cloth keeps pulling the paint out of the cracks, use your finger to wipe the excess paint off. Black washing works best on shiny paint, If the surface is rough or absorbent, like a mat finish, you can end up staining the whole area. In that case you might just have to break out the tiny brush and painstakingly draw those lines in. The wash will usually do it though. And don't forget, you can make a wash out of any paint. Sometimes gunmetal or even a dark color can work even better to add dimension.
    I hope that helps!
     
  4. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Since this thread is discussing a process topic, it's been moved to Radicons General Discussion.

    As far as the topic itself goes, I'll typically use dilluted flat black for washes. Also, my aim is to normally make the area weathered as well as bringing out the paint details. Pouring a little paint into a separate container and then adding water creates a good reservoir for this sort of thing. When I weather a part, I keep in mind what gravity does to weathering as well. I set the piece in the resting position, then apply the wash. This allows for a natural-looking weathering to the part, as actual weathering to objects is drastically affected by gravity.

    If your aim is to simply panel line the detail, you would simply need to wipe more of the excess paint away.

    Best wishes to you with your future endeavors! :thumb 
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2009
  5. godspeed

    godspeed (Dead)Head Master

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    This is why I love radicons!!!

    Thanks for the great advice, I will post some pics when I am done. Hopefully they are good, if not they will be good for a laugh at least!!!
     
  6. gargunkle

    gargunkle someone

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    Hobby shops that sell miniatures also typically sell ink, which is basically already the right strength to use for this without adding water. You can also get something called a Gundam Marker.
     
  7. Tom_Servo

    Tom_Servo Well-read chick magnet

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    I've never tried ink, but I have tried Gundam markers. In my experience they're just over-priced regular brush-tipped markers and fine tipped paint markers.
    SQ7 is right on about the flat black. It's the best base for dry brushing too. Using flat colors in the darks and shiny ones on the high points is a good trick for adding depth.
    Another tool that you can exploit for a weathered effect is dabbing on the paint with a textured item, like a paper towel, a rag or even kitchen sponge.
    For grimy shades on a figure it's best to take the color that's already there (or as close as you have) and neutralize it with it's compliment. Example- add green to red, orange to blue, purple to yellow. If you get it right, that will give you a great muddy, neutral color for your dark areas.
     

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