Customs: best tool for pin punching?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by SMOG, Nov 17, 2009.

  1. SMOG

    SMOG Vocab-champion ArgueTitan

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    Heya guys...

    Whenever I've had to dismantle a TF and I've gotten to the pins, I've had pretty mixed results. Sometimes I'm able to punch out the pins pretty easily with improvised tools (small screwdrivers, rubber mallet, etc), while other times, it's been an absolute nightmare.

    I figured it's about time to get a specialized tool for the job, so I won't get bogged at that stage.

    Can anyone recommend a good, reliable pin-punching tool?

    Watch Band Pin Remover Punch Spring Bar Replacing Tool - eBay (item 200405140753 end time Dec-12-09 01:53:05 PST)
    I saw this one on ebay from Australia... seems to have a built-in spring mechanism, but I'm not sure if it would be strong enough. I've seen other pin-punches online, but it's been unclear if they actually have a punching mechanism, or whether they're just a pin with a metal grip.

    Thanks for any info! :) 

    zmog
     
  2. the (H)i(GH)con

    the (H)i(GH)con raver-in-diguise

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    I have this same problem all the time. Right now, for example, I'm painting a ROTF Ravage and I can't get the leg pins out to save my life. If you find something, I'd love to hear how well it works.
     
  3. QmTablit

    QmTablit Disguise: Check. Robot...

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    Yeah, punching out pins is the absolute worst part of this hobby. Sometimes they go, most of the time not. And worse yet, we get pins that only have one exposed end. And that's just butt.
     
  4. swampflight

    swampflight Banned

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    Pin removal

    Get yourself some small steel skewers(about 8 to 10 inches long) and file down the point until its flat.You can then insert it in the hole(add your own joke)because the diameter of the skewer is usually smaller than the diameter of the hole the pin was inserted in and tap it with,as suggested,a small rubber mallet to avoid damage.I've done it this way when restoring rusty pins and it works every time and a little shot of WD-40 helps lubricate(again,add your own joke)the pin for easy removal and the loop at the end of the skewer makes a better focal point for the hammer.
     
  5. plowking

    plowking I'm with ErechOveraker. Veteran

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    I use a 1/8 Starter Punch. Works like a charm, hasn't let me down yet. Here is a link to what they look like:

    SK Center Punches, Starter Punches and Sets

    You don't have to buy the most expensive one you see either. You should be able to pick up a single one for under $5 at your local hardware/tool store.
     
  6. SMOG

    SMOG Vocab-champion ArgueTitan

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    Thanks for the responses guys... has anyone every used one of these punches with the built-in spring mechanism? Do they work well for TF pins?

    zmog
     
  7. plowking

    plowking I'm with ErechOveraker. Veteran

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    I've used that type of punch before, just not on TF's....it does work great though for metal work....but IMO, I think you'd be better off just using a regular punch for TF's
     
  8. minsok

    minsok Well-Known Member

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    It's not that bad, I usually just use a long pin, a hammer, and my knee. Once I get a little out, I yank out the rest with needle nose pliers. If it's a pin that's been inserted and is closed on one end, I either expose the open end and yank it out or saw the plastic along the entire length. Doesn't take any time at all, but I'm not a perfectionist. Having to carve that hard rubber that can't be sanded or buzzsawed through is way worse.
     
  9. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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  10. SMOG

    SMOG Vocab-champion ArgueTitan

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    It's got a spring? Now THAT'S the kind I need!

    zmog

     
  11. Tampalicious

    Tampalicious Tribe of Roadimus

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    Thanks! I have an Apeface that needs an arm took apart and rescrewed, but the damn pin is holding his underbelly in place, so I had to stop.....

    Along the same lines, how does one go about getting replacement pins? Or is there a trick to fixing the loose ones? well placed paint?

    Damn pins.....
     
  12. Mathius Maximus

    Mathius Maximus Well-Known Member

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    You can get these a LOT cheaper at harbor freight, particularly if there's one in your area: Search results for: 'center punch'

    I took mine home from work and tried it, and it works ok. You have to be doubly careful you're punching from the correct end though, because it has so much torque behind it that it can ruin the toy, either by damaging surrounding plastic or mashing the end of the pin you're trying to remove. I've also found that with a center punch it's possible to start removing the pin from the wrong end and it's a bitch to get them out, and even more of a bitch to push them in to get at them from the right side. I had it slip and go through my thumb and decided I'd try a pin punch.

    I bought a 1/16" pin punch and haven't looked back. SOO much easier.

    I AM throwing around the idea of making my own tool to remove them though. My idea is to take a c-clamp, drill a hole in the center of it and weld a 1/16" pin punch to the other end of it, so it forces the pin right out through the hole as you crank on the c-clamp. Problem is figuring out a way to get a properly centered hole through the base of a c-clamp that isn't HUGE.

    Mathius
     
  13. chrisr291

    chrisr291 Master of the Unknown

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    Would this work on Masterpiece Thundercrackers boob Pin's so I can flip them?
     
  14. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Well, it's good to know that you can find these cheaper.

    As far as pin punching itself is concerned, not all pins have one end or another has a correct end. An example of this would be an Alternators/Binaltech S2000 hinge on the convertible top/chest. The jagged edge is located in the center of the pin.

    Mathius is right in that you have to be careful with this spring-loaded punch. I've punched my fingers/hand a few times, and the few times I have it hurt. However, anytime one is using these types of tools, proper care needs to be taken.

    The benefit of the spring-loaded punch is just that - you get extra "oomph" for your punch. Some of those pins that be can be really real pain to remove are less of a pain :) 
     
  15. Jaicen

    Jaicen Well-Known Member

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    With regards to building a custom pin removing too, the G-clamp idea is a good one, except for the drilling part. Most of them will be hardened steel (don't buy one that's not!), so drilling would be difficult. My advice would be to attach a holder to the bottom that can take various diameters of PVC pipe. That would lower the likelihood of having anything damaged while tightening it up.
     
  16. Mathius Maximus

    Mathius Maximus Well-Known Member

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    If a carbide tip won't go through it, some heat from a torch will make it go through. Anneal it first. Doesn't NEED to be that hard either. We're talking about small, brittle, plastic pieces.

    I don't see much point in having the hole much bigger than 1/8". I want it ideally to brace the toy and leave room for the pin to pass through.

    Mathius
     

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