Aussie Medical students fail basic anatomy

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Rodimus Prime, May 6, 2006.

  1. Rodimus Prime

    Rodimus Prime Sola Gratia, Sola Fide TFW2005 Supporter

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    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,19042005-2702,00.html
     
  2. flamepanther

    flamepanther Interested, but not really

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    :eek: 

    Looks like I won't be visiting Australia until this changes. I had always wanted to take a vacation there.
     
  3. Napjr

    Napjr <b><font color=gold>Mr. Internet</font><br><font c Veteran

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    all you would need to do in case you need a Dr, is to look for one with at least 10 years in the practice :p 
     
  4. flamepanther

    flamepanther Interested, but not really

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    You don't exactly get a choice in the emergency room, do you? It's not like I'm going to be looking for a regular physician or planning major surgery during a vacation :p 
     
  5. Acid Wing

    Acid Wing Senior Alien TF Member

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    Huh, that's interesting, it seems a 4th year med student in Australia is around the age 22, while the general age here for 4th year is 26 (meaning 4 years of undergrad, then 4 years med school). But this estimate is in no way the average age since anyone of any age can enter med school with the proper academic credentials...

    As for the article, to me, it's good that the education system there is attempting to address the problem....but I personally disagree with laying part of the blame on the "touchy-feely" stuff.
    Having medical knowledge is one thing, but without the ability to communicate with the patient in a clear and human manner, is vital to becoming an effective physician.
     

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