Are TFs really made that well????!!!!!

Discussion in 'Transformers Toy Discussion' started by Jimmy88, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. Jimmy88

    Jimmy88 Well-Known Member

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    Hey dudes Jimmy here in Autobot City. Now many questions are arising with me every since I brought out my Beast Wars due to completing them. Now in my last post I said that I had to fix the Fallen and Transmetal Megs. So tonight was pretty promising. Glued the Fallens head back on(that isnt going anywhere) and glued Megs arm back on(you couldnt pry that damn thing off). It was all looking up right up until I was transforming Megs and as I was twisting the waste, yeah hey is now in two pieces. I am writing this due to trying to get out of depression and due to wanting to ask you guys these following questions.

    Are TFs really made that well???
    Given that Megs is 10+years old and that I recently learned about his cheap gold plastic, but now look at the Fallen not even 2 years old and I had a problem. More importantly will something like this happen again to my film collection, why do I ask, if you look at ROTF Leader Primes back angled panels where his tanks are, that peg and screw that you spin the panel on is showing ware around it(that early sign of lighter plastic=early sign of cracking). Now will that ever break off because if something were to happen to him or Buster or any of my other film toys Ill freak because they are my favorites. And if anything else is going to happen to my prized Beast Wars Ill die.

    This even brings me to my next question, following hearing that I should look into Japanese Transmetal Megs due to being made better and looking at how much smoother Buster was to transform, if Hasbro and Takara are indeed the same company and they put out the same product how come the Japanese ones are made better???!!!!! Well dudes I hope you didnt mind reading all this and please let me know your thoughts:) 
     
  2. bellpeppers

    bellpeppers A Meat Popsicle

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    Let me just say that the engineering that go into Transformers is nothing short of imaginative and amazing.

    Problem is this: sometimes, they try to pack too much into too small of package, and sometimes stuff pop off or are easily broken.

    Either cut back on engineering... or make figures a little bigger for thicker / more durable plastic.
     
  3. katch26

    katch26 Well-Known Member

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    No offense but you need to start collecting nerf footballs
     
  4. Jimmy88

    Jimmy88 Well-Known Member

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    LOL:) 
     
  5. Abrogate

    Abrogate Nondescript Former Poster

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    Transformers are made very well. The only problem is that Transmetal Megatron was made with a type of plastic that chemically breaks down easily. The Japanese one is not made of the same plastic, which is why it doesn't have that issue (nor do most Transformers)
     
  6. Red Hope

    Red Hope Well-Known Member

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    lol. I asked that one a few ago. If you can throw it against a wall and it stays intact, then it's good quality! :lol 

    Seriously. I think it depends on how you really wanna look at it. The G1s were beasts when it came to weight between a heavy plastic and metals. They've been around for 30'ish years now. Then the modern TFs, they're light and can pop arms, legs, and heads on and off... to a point. If you popped those off a G1, you could be screwed for good.

    What says a lot, to me, is my nephew playing with G1s and modern ones. I've noticed he prefers my old G1s because they fit exact and stay together. He gets mad when a modern TF's leg pops off. He'll lose it or isn't sure how to get it back on. He's only four though. He also learns how to transform the G1s faster than the modern, but again G1s are simpler in transforming, I think.

    I think the modern vs the old stuff have their +s and -s, gives and takes. I guess someday we'll see how the current TFs are fairing in 30 years. :D 
     
  7. Jimmy88

    Jimmy88 Well-Known Member

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    Yah know that line wouldnt have scared me as much last week.......
     
  8. Red Hope

    Red Hope Well-Known Member

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    lol! Sorry about that one! I'm sure the current TFs will be fine in 30 years.... maybe. ;)  Just don't play with 'em. You'll be golden then. haha
     
  9. Jimmy88

    Jimmy88 Well-Known Member

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    Oh no thats ok...I transform them on occasion but am very careful.....especially with the film ones because some of them are literally masterpiece level....
     
  10. PlanckEpoch

    PlanckEpoch Brony

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    Transformers are made pretty damn well as a whole. There's a few bad examples, but I haven't had a single issue with any of the toys I've got, and it's mostly ROTF, Generations, and Reveal the Shield.

    Sucks that you've got a fig that's suffering from GPS, and the deal with the Fallen blows, but I don't think you need to worry much about the rest of your collection.
     
  11. Sammael

    Sammael MightyMegatron from ATT TFW2005 Supporter

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    G1 transformers are much, much easier to transform than modern ones. I really don't think modern TFs are appropriate for most 4-year-olds.
     
  12. Superquad7

    Superquad7 We're only human. Super Mod

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    Generally speaking: YES!

    However, I think much depends on how the person interacts with them. I can boastfully say that most of my G1s survived 25+ years with little to no damage. However, despite many of those toys logging in some serious play hours, I was still very careful with my things.

    That said, certain toys have certain points that are more fragile. The Fairlady Datsuns have the fragile roof, for example. Chrome weapons tend to show wear easily. The bottom line is that they're still plastic toys.

    While I think some of the modern TFs certainly have some edges over the vintage TFs in this sense, they're not totally out of the picture either, as has been the case in this thread. I do think that over the last decade or so, things like heads and arms being able to be popped off and on show the deliberate effort on Hasbro/Takara[TOMY]'s part to be proactive on this issue.
     
  13. knoted

    knoted Resistor Transistor

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    Regardless of which TF line, they're generally well made. Afterall, they are meant to be toys.

    If you compare them to Japanese collector item Mecha, you'll see you pay 4 times as much for the Mecha which you'll have to handle with absolute care to the power of 4.

    So even if a TF breaks, it's easier to replace a 15 to 20 dollar TF toy than a 100 dollar collectors item.
     
  14. kajobaldisimo

    kajobaldisimo Well-Known Member

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    yes
     
  15. exomega255

    exomega255 Emerald Green

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    With their shitty budget and time constraints, as well as other restrictions given to their design team (of which they have minimum say)? Yes. They are VERY well done. Compare it to other toys.


    The difference between Takara and Hasbro is audience and cost. Hasbro is limited that certain size class HAVE to cost this or that amount. They also cater to kids. Takara caters to collectors more, and are not limited to a cost constraint.
     
  16. Edgewise

    Edgewise updated homage

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    The plastic on TM Megs that breaks doesn't break because it's cheaper/less expensive. That plastic was chosen for color/deco, not for cheapness.

    Hasbro & Takara aren't the same company, just partners with the Transformers property and Takara doesn't make TFs better than Hasbro. Sometimes they do have a larger budget for more paint, and there are always subjective choices for everyone to make about which deco they like better, but Takara TFs are not always superior in durability.

    Hasbro's TM Megs has the problem due to using "gold plastic", while Takara's doesn't because they chose a different color.

    However, Hasbro's BW Razorbeast figure is much more durable than Takara's release of that mold as Randy in BW Neo. Nothing to due with each company's over all quality or cheapness, but just the fact that Takara chose to use gold plastic on that mold.

    So why do they continue to use gold plastic? They used it back to G1 even. They like the look of it on some toys I guess and are more concerned with that then with making the toys durable enough to last many, many years.

    While that disappoints me as a collector who wants a durable toy, I certainly understand that making a children's toy last 10+ years shouldn't be the top priority for a toy company. Their target market is kids afterall, and the intended purpose of these products is just to entertain them for a few years in childhood.
     
  17. videriant

    videriant Well-Known Member

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    Here's the question. What other transforming two+ mode robot toy is made better then transformers? Especially on a per $ basis.
     
  18. Cornholiocon

    Cornholiocon Up the irons!

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    Overall I'd say yes, TF's are constructed well, especially considering that they're MEANT to constantly have their limbs and small parts continually moved and folded into various positions.
    I'm strictly a G1 collector and believe that these are the best made since heavy plastics and metal were used in their construction, but they obviously don't have the range of motion and detail of their newer modern counterparts.
    Toy safety standards have also changed in the last 30 years and whereas if something popped off of a G1 it would most likely be broken and you'd be out of luck, newer TFs and toys in general are designed to have limbs that pop off and can be snapped back on vice broken for good.
    No matter what era you collect, I think that the overall quality and durability of TF's are impressive.
     
  19. mx-01 archon

    mx-01 archon Well-Known Member

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    Subjectively, you can broaden that scope to action figures in general. For the per-$ basis, Transformers are some of the best value out there. Deluxe figures are comparable in size to other 6" action figure lines, and yet contain many more moving parts, require intricate engineering, and even feature comparable articulation levels, and still manage to cost about the same.
     

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