Any of you guys...actually ever look into a career in the toy buisi

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Optronix_prime, Apr 27, 2010.

  1. Optronix_prime

    Optronix_prime Well-Known Member

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    I'm currently thinking "toys" is the path I want to go towards. Dream being hasbro and working on our beloved transformers. Just wondering if any of you guys have any experience in trying to get in, or if any of you ARE in.

    Who better to work on toys than the fans?
     
  2. slugslinger2004

    slugslinger2004 TFW2005 Supporter

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    I'm in no way affiliated with any toys companies but there are a few questions you should ask yourself first.

    What exactly are you trying to do? Do you want to design the toys? Marketing? Management? There are many facets to a business that you could get into.
     
  3. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    1. How old are you?

    2. Are you in high school or college?

    3. Toy designers largely come from architectural, design, mechanical engineering or electrical engineering fields. Are you interested in any of those?

    4. From conversations with a friend and fellow colleague who used to be involved in Fisher-Price toys, I gleaned that a lot of the real challenge in being recognized as a viable member of a toy design team is being able to prove yourself.
    - Be prepared to come up with UNIQUE toys (not just transformers) that stretch childerens' imaginations
    - Have multiple ideas/visions for unique toys; at least enough to garner the attention of a major-name company (like Hasbro)
    - You'll need to demo these toys at your own booth at places like ToyFair - usually there is a separate wing of demo booths for up-and-coming designers
    - All the while, build a portfolio of toys you've built & designed, as well as toys you've worked on with other companies. This portfolio would become part of your resume when applying for a job with any toy company.
     
  4. Optronix_prime

    Optronix_prime Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking Management or Marketing. I am somewhat skilled with drawing in stuff, but no where near what is expected to design the things.
     
  5. Optronix_prime

    Optronix_prime Well-Known Member

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    Been going to college for 2 years now for an associates in arts (which I'll get this summer), and all of those areas I could further my education into.
     
  6. Omnius

    Omnius Well-Known Member

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    I looked into it at one point, but it requires a lot of education - a degree in engineering, design, or ergonomics is essential.
     
  7. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    Well, one thing to think about is that, while the career path would be more difficult for designing toys, you WOULD be a bit more recognizable as a candidate for a position in any toy company. Enough toys under your belt - especially something that gets peoples attention as a "wow" toy of any caliber - and you become a wanted resource.

    Marketing would be a neat route to go, but your competition gets a bit more stiff there, mostly because (and no offense to the marketing folks here) but there are plenty more artists out there who can take a graphic design/marketing degree and get recognized for their artistry then there are toy engineers actually engaged in designing from ground up. Don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with the graphic design/marketing route, it's just that you're going to have much more competition - you'd need to be at your absolute best, especially to get hired by a company who relies so heavily on aggressive marketing like Hasbro.

    There are millions of management folks out there. Don't go that route.
     
  8. slugslinger2004

    slugslinger2004 TFW2005 Supporter

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    I was going to type up a huge wall o' text, but Ops_was_a_truck pretty much nailed it.
     
  9. Optronix_prime

    Optronix_prime Well-Known Member

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    Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks a lot guys, I was really at a loss at how to get into the industry.
     
  10. Plastic Man

    Plastic Man The Man in Black

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    I've thought about getting involved in the retail end of the spectrum. I admire BBTS's business model and I think something like this would be a cool way to transform your passion for toys into an actual business. You'd have to get a business loan, rent a storage and processing facility, contract a website development company, hire a staff, etc. It would be a huge task to undertake with a lot of risk. But that's what it would take to start a business.

    Or you could design an action figure exhibit that could travel to museums across the country. Or an action figure museum! I know some of the collectors on here damn near own a museum already.:p 
     
  11. prime13

    prime13 UCHUU KITAAAA

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    Well, I'm HOPING to get into design in the future. but I know it's going to be hard to get there, especially since i'm in Canada.
     
  12. Insane Galvatron

    Insane Galvatron is not insane. Really!

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    Or you could just start your own third party accessory company like iGear or FansProjects. :D 
     
  13. Cavshock

    Cavshock Well-Known Member

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    I almost got a job at Patch Products.
    An idea for getting your foot in the door would be to just get a job at one of these places. Security gaurd, janitor, warehouse...anything to get in so you can get a feel for the people working there. While working there take classes that would improve the skills you need. If the opportunity comes up, try for an intern job.

    Chuck
     
  14. Ops_was_a_truck

    Ops_was_a_truck JOOOLIE ANDREWWWWWS!!!!!!

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    So Chuck, I totally don't want to seem like I'm dissing you or anything, but I think that's actually a bad idea. I've had a few jobs that are basic-grade positions with high name companies, approaching them with the same mentality - "If I rub elbows with so-and-so enough, I'll get recognized!" - and I feel like, at least from experience, that's the wrong way to go. To TRULY get recognized for a position that would put OP very close to the toy design & marketing business, it would be wiser for him to aggressively pursue a marketing or engineering degree. That would make him a more viable contender than somebody in the warehouse. Employees already involved in the design/marketing/management positions treat of the jobs you're describing as a stereotype - "Oh, so and so? He seems intelligent, but he's just a warehouse guy." It's not a way to get recognized.
     
  15. Cavshock

    Cavshock Well-Known Member

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    I think the key part to my point is going to further your education in the fields needed. When you finish up and its interview time, hey look its me!

    Chuck
     
  16. Wheeljack_Prime

    Wheeljack_Prime Don't eat me

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    I once was a ceramic engineering major. Had I stuck with that, I might have considered the toy business as a career path.
     
  17. Autobot_Wall-E

    Autobot_Wall-E The Musical

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    I have discovered that toy making and video game maing are alike: they aren't as fun as it's cracked up to be nor is it as awesome as the big shots in the business make it seem. You have to be a senior manager to make big bucks in those businesses :( 

    I still may look into video game programming since programers make quite the paycheck even starting out :D 
     
  18. mrclean08

    mrclean08 G1 FOR LIFE

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    It's amazing how Engineering can take you to far places in tons of industries. I wish I would've gotten that degree.
     
  19. TrueNomadSkies

    TrueNomadSkies Airachnid's ratservant

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    Step 1 - Make a thread on TFW
    Step 2 - Apply at TRU
    Step 3 - Get job
    Step 4 - Actually work your ass off couse a job is still a job
    Step 5 - Get paid, get Vehicons
    Step 6 - Repeat step 1 :) 
     
  20. Cyber-Scream

    Cyber-Scream Well-Known Member

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    I've thought about it in the past but I don't see it being a realistic option now.
     

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