Customs: Air Brushing (compressor/gun/technique questions)

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Oric, Jul 10, 2007.

  1. Oric

    Oric Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I have rescently got into alot of the kitbashing and painting (in so far as interest) and messed around with assemblies for a bit.

    THe thing is as far as money goes, I would be more willing spend a greater ammount on equipment than multiple figures.

    I have already decided to pick up some old toys from garage sales to mess around withbut my goal is some movie accurate paint applications for prime and megatron, maybe give prime a metallic blue finish instead.

    I have been looking around for some compressors and guns and I have already done some painting on planes with my father (full scale models) so I do have some background.

    THere qare a few questions I have though.

    1) Considering cost versus quality, on a small scale with a professional look does anyone have any suggestions on which compressor to get and what equipment? I want my figures to look as close to factory as possble, so that means solid thing layers of paint if possible.

    2) Does anyone know some good resources for this style of painting?

    This site is amazing, but considering the knowledge I do have of paint apps already, I wouldn't want to dabble too much in an altogether different media, and considering the movie editions small parts the sanding could be overly grusome with regular paint aps through a spray can.

    I want to get Megs as show accurate as possible to the film but add some artistic touches I would love t share. I have a specific vision in mind for him and read threads for kylash and shin (is it shin?) as well as a very impressive model done by RK studios I do believe.

    IN addition I really liked the Nemesis primes done by RK and someone who posted in the Customs/Kits threads.

    I have always loved making things how I wanted them to be and it is such a blessing to come into this forum to see such an astounding amount of artistic detail in so many pieces.

    Now I have read the main article posted here but it didnt specify airbrushing so I figured this thread may be useful for those looking for an alternate, albeit more expensive route to customs.
     
  2. NotFastEnuff

    NotFastEnuff I'm a smartass...

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    I know back when I was doing model cars that a lot of the guys were using real car paints and some used thinned down nail polish. One thing that I know you have to watch when doing that is the chemical "hotness" of your paints. Some paint can melt plastic when the chemical reaction it uses to dry begins. As far as auto paint, you can hit up the body supply stores in your area, but I'm not sure how willing they'll be to mix up anything smaller than a quart. You might try the auto touch up paints in part stores or the automotive section in WM, but I'm not sure the quality of those. Hope I've helped, and good luck with it.
     
  3. NotFastEnuff

    NotFastEnuff I'm a smartass...

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    I know back when I was doing model cars that a lot of the guys were using real car paints and some used thinned down nail polish. One thing that I know you have to watch when doing that is the chemical "hotness" of your paints. Some paint can melt plastic when the chemical reaction it uses to dry begins. As far as auto paint, you can hit up the body supply stores in your area, but I'm not sure how willing they'll be to mix up anything smaller than a quart. You might try the auto touch up paints in part stores or the automotive section in WM, but I'm not sure the quality of those. Hope I've helped, and good luck with it.
     
  4. Jimmyjimjim

    Jimmyjimjim Well-Known Member

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    The most important thing to a good paintjob is prep. The better you clean the surface, the better your primer, the better your wet-sanding, the better your paint is. I've achieved a finish just as good as catalytic auto paint with Tamiya spray paint sold in Hobby stores. I posted a big tutorial once, but I'll be damned if I can find it without the "search" (where the hell did that go?!?)

    I personally wouldn't use catalytic paints in an airbrush because chances are you're going to gunk it up quick. For airbrushing, I'd use an acrylic or enamel and clearcoat it. As long as you give PLENTY of drying time, the finish is very durable.

    I feel like a heel for posting painting tips (being as I haven't done a custom TF paint, but I've done a hell of alot of models, so I'm pretty confident that my method works.
     
  5. Jimmyjimjim

    Jimmyjimjim Well-Known Member

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    The most important thing to a good paintjob is prep. The better you clean the surface, the better your primer, the better your wet-sanding, the better your paint is. I've achieved a finish just as good as catalytic auto paint with Tamiya spray paint sold in Hobby stores. I posted a big tutorial once, but I'll be damned if I can find it without the "search" (where the hell did that go?!?)

    I personally wouldn't use catalytic paints in an airbrush because chances are you're going to gunk it up quick. For airbrushing, I'd use an acrylic or enamel and clearcoat it. As long as you give PLENTY of drying time, the finish is very durable.

    I feel like a heel for posting painting tips (being as I haven't done a custom TF paint, but I've done a hell of alot of models, so I'm pretty confident that my method works.
     
  6. Oric

    Oric Well-Known Member

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    No, thank you!

    Actually model painters tend to have increrdible custom paintjobs.

    I am not as concerned about doing custom kitbashes, but I would really like to do a whole movie line as close to accurate colors as possible.

    I let my eight year old brother play around with my Leader Prime from the film, which was a mistake as I notice paint wear of a minor bit in two places *close to the thigh joints) and some 'scratching' off of the paint around the gun 'fist' I had forgotten how tight that joint was so naturally as a little kid he tried all he could to do it on his own before coming to me.

    I felt bad for him so i loosened the screw a bit that was holding it but then it got me thinknig about doing a really pimped out paint job for leader prime since the scaling and measurements of the cab are almost bang on from the film.

    A minor custom I would really love to do on it as well is to remove the blue plastic headlights and replace them with clear flat ones and maybe ecen have them 'lightup' if I can manage to do it. There is a ton of space left behind the foot area in the action joint for the feet, at least enough for a watch battery.

    But if I can do primes then i can do my leader Megatron, I just really want to get the thinnest coat I can find that is durable.

    I also need to chrome stuff, I hear there is a foiling technique but I am not sure how to do that at all.

    But yeah this is prety much what I wanna do, and I have some of my younger brothers broken ninja turtles now to practice on.

    Any other suggestions?
     
  7. Oric

    Oric Well-Known Member

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    No, thank you!

    Actually model painters tend to have increrdible custom paintjobs.

    I am not as concerned about doing custom kitbashes, but I would really like to do a whole movie line as close to accurate colors as possible.

    I let my eight year old brother play around with my Leader Prime from the film, which was a mistake as I notice paint wear of a minor bit in two places *close to the thigh joints) and some 'scratching' off of the paint around the gun 'fist' I had forgotten how tight that joint was so naturally as a little kid he tried all he could to do it on his own before coming to me.

    I felt bad for him so i loosened the screw a bit that was holding it but then it got me thinknig about doing a really pimped out paint job for leader prime since the scaling and measurements of the cab are almost bang on from the film.

    A minor custom I would really love to do on it as well is to remove the blue plastic headlights and replace them with clear flat ones and maybe ecen have them 'lightup' if I can manage to do it. There is a ton of space left behind the foot area in the action joint for the feet, at least enough for a watch battery.

    But if I can do primes then i can do my leader Megatron, I just really want to get the thinnest coat I can find that is durable.

    I also need to chrome stuff, I hear there is a foiling technique but I am not sure how to do that at all.

    But yeah this is prety much what I wanna do, and I have some of my younger brothers broken ninja turtles now to practice on.

    Any other suggestions?
     
  8. Greyryder

    Greyryder Kitbashed

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    Iwata airbrush. I'd suggest something from their Revolution line. Iwata makes pretty much the best airbrushes you can get. I have one, and it's worth the cost.

    In a compressor you need to make sure you get a water trap, and a pressure regulator. If you don't mind the noise, you can pick up a big old general use compressor with a tank, from just about home improvement store. You can even get them at walmart. If you want something quieter, I can recomend the Silentaire line of air brush compressors. I use mine all the time, with peoiple sleeping in the next room.

    I've had good luck with Testors Model Master acrylic model paints. Every TF will have places that will rub the paint off. You can minimize that sanding or filing down the pieces that rub against each other. On small trouble spots, you can also smear some super glue over the rouble area, to protect the paint. I wouldn't recomend that for large areas.

    Future floor polish is a durable acrylic clear coat. It tends to work best when applied a bit thick, but I've found that adding a few drops to a jar of paint, helps the paint cure to a harder finish. Don't add too much, or you'll make the paint transparent. (usefull for effects over metallic paints)

    For the chrome, get a metallizing laquer. Alclad II is about the best one available, and one of the few that don't require buffing. A clear coat over it, might be a good idea.

    Hope all this is coherent. I should be in bed, by now.
     
  9. Greyryder

    Greyryder Kitbashed

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    Iwata airbrush. I'd suggest something from their Revolution line. Iwata makes pretty much the best airbrushes you can get. I have one, and it's worth the cost.

    In a compressor you need to make sure you get a water trap, and a pressure regulator. If you don't mind the noise, you can pick up a big old general use compressor with a tank, from just about home improvement store. You can even get them at walmart. If you want something quieter, I can recomend the Silentaire line of air brush compressors. I use mine all the time, with peoiple sleeping in the next room.

    I've had good luck with Testors Model Master acrylic model paints. Every TF will have places that will rub the paint off. You can minimize that sanding or filing down the pieces that rub against each other. On small trouble spots, you can also smear some super glue over the rouble area, to protect the paint. I wouldn't recomend that for large areas.

    Future floor polish is a durable acrylic clear coat. It tends to work best when applied a bit thick, but I've found that adding a few drops to a jar of paint, helps the paint cure to a harder finish. Don't add too much, or you'll make the paint transparent. (usefull for effects over metallic paints)

    For the chrome, get a metallizing laquer. Alclad II is about the best one available, and one of the few that don't require buffing. A clear coat over it, might be a good idea.

    Hope all this is coherent. I should be in bed, by now.
     

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