A Question for All You Lawyers

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Nachtsider, May 27, 2011.

  1. Nachtsider

    Nachtsider Banned

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    Consider this scenario.

    A client (Lee) confides in his lawyer (Bob) that he is the Butcher, the infamous serial killer who has terrorized the district for over a decade and never been caught. Bob is bound by attorney-client privilege not to say a word.

    After agonizing over what he's been told for several days, Bob decides to anonymously tip off the police, calling from an isolated payphone in the middle of the night, with a hood over his head and putting on a fake voice. "Hello? Police? I saw a guy with a knife in his hand and blood on his clothes pulling his Chevy up in the driveway of the blue house on Fifth Street and then entering. No, it's not a break-in; I think he lives there. He let himself in with a key. He's about five-ten, a hundred eighty pounds, brown hair and glasses. Had a nasty scar on his cheek, too. My name? No, I'd rather not say. Buh-bye."

    Of course, there was no guy with blood on his clothes and a knife in his hand pulling his Chevy up in the driveway of the blue house on Fifth Street and entering the place that very night. But the address, make of car and physical description are all Lee's.

    The police raid Lee's house and discover enough evidence to hang him for the Butcher murders a hundred times over (murder weapons, body part trophies, et cetera). Lee is shot and wounded while trying to make a break for it, and is taken into custody. Naturally, his suspicion turns to his lawyer, and he, enraged, accuses Bob of breaking privilege.

    Bob counters just as vehemently that he did nothing of the sort. It becomes a case of the lawyer's word against the client's. No-one can prove that Bob was the anonymous tipster.

    What would become of the case of The People versus Lee?
     
  2. grimlock1972

    grimlock1972 "No Mas" My Wallet

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    unless the lawyer was representing him for the actual murder charges or anything in connection with them , I am not sure it would have any bearing on the criminal trial at all as long as that lawyer did not represent him in the murder trial which would be epically unlikely as he tipped the police off in the first place.

    now as a civil matter If Lee could prove his lawyer broke attorney-client privilege he might be able to sue him.


    I am not a lawyer however so i could be dead wrong , just my gut feelings.
     
  3. Nachtsider

    Nachtsider Banned

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    Nope, Bob wasn't representing Lee for the actual murder charges. Prior to now, Lee had not been so much as even remotely suspected of being the Butcher.
     
  4. grimlock1972

    grimlock1972 "No Mas" My Wallet

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    Then Bob's action would not mean a thing as far as the murder charges go, now if he was defending Lee for the murder charges then it would be different.
     

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