Customs: 1:24 or 1:25?

Discussion in 'Creative General Discussion' started by Monkey-Hands, Sep 3, 2007.

  1. Monkey-Hands

    Monkey-Hands Turntablist

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    How big is the difference between those scales??
    Do I even see a notable difference?
     
  2. Optimus Layne

    Optimus Layne Autobot Commander

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    Model figures are measured in two different ways; scales and height standards. The difference between the two often confuses many modellers. Simply put, a scale is a ratio between the size of the model and the size of an actual object (in this case a person), stated as a fraction (1/32 scale); while a standard is a set size of figure, usually given in millimetres (54mm). Figures intended to be displayed with model vehicles are generally labelled with a scale, while figures which are sold as stand-alone models are often labelled with a height standard.
    Scales are generally pretty straightforward - a 1/32 figure is 1/32 of the height of a real person. Standards, on the other hand, are highly subjective. There are two methods of measuring a figure to a height standard. The modern standard is to measure from the heel to the crown of the head, the stated height being that of an average person standing erect. The older standard, still in use by some manufacturers (Phoenix, for example), is to measure from the heel to the eye. This results in a somewhat larger figure - a heel-head standard 54mm figure is approximately 1/32 scale, while a eye-head 54mm standard figure works out to about 1/29 scale.

    Since human beings vary greatly in height (I'm 5'-4" tall, while my friend Dave is 6'-2", a 15% difference), it usually isn't that great a problem to display a heel-head standard figure in a diorama with a heel-eye standard figure, or to use similarly scaled figures together. 1/24 and 1/25 scale figures can be mixed, as can 1/32 and 1/35 scale figures. The smaller scale figures merely look like shorter people. The size of the figure's equipment is more problematic, especially with height standard figures where the size of the equipment is "eyeballed" by the sculptor to look right with the individual figure. In scaled figures, equipment sized should be consistent throughout a scale - simply pick which scale you wish the equipment to be and equip all the figures with that scale. Generally, I prefer to use the larger of the two scales for the equipment - all 1/32 scale equipment with a mix of 1/32 and 1/35 figures, for example. For fantasy figures where equipment is non-standardised, this is irrelevant, but for military and SF figures, identical items should be identically sized.

    Height standard figures were made more complicated with the advent of fantasy gaming miniatures in the 1970's. Theoretically, a 25mm figure of a hobbit should be 25mm tall, the same height as a 25mm human figure. Since these miniatures were meant to be used together on a dungeon map or a miniature battlefield, manufacturers began treating the standards as scales. Thus, although nominally 25mm, the hobbit figure was done in proportion to the human figure and may actually only heve been 15mm tall. Also, since the smaller a figure the more fragile it was, certain manufacturers began making their figures taller and taller, while keeping the same standard designation. Nowadays, most nominally 25mm human-sized gaming figures actually run 28mm high (25mm heel-eye), while some reach as high as 30 or even 32mm high.

    Although the gauge system (HO, O, N, etc.) used by railroad modellers seems arcane, it's really just a scale system, for the most part. The gauge refers to how far apart the rails are on the track, this being of overriding importance for a functioning model railroad layout, but largely irrelevant to figure modellers who simply want to adapt the wide range of available railroad accessory figures available. With few exceptions, gauges correspond to set scales. The major differences are O gauge, which has different scale standards depending on whether you're in Britain or North America; and G gauge, which covers a large range in practice. Several railroad model gauges correspond closely to standard modelling scales, as shown in the table below.

    Scale
    Gauge
    mm Standard**
    Imperial/English


    1/288- 6mm


    1"=24'

    1/220
    Z
    -
    1"=18'-4"

    1/160
    N
    -
    1"=13'-4"

    1/144
    -
    -
    1"=12'

    1/120
    -
    15mm
    1"=10'

    1/100
    -
    -
    1"=8'-4"

    1/96
    -
    -
    1"=8'

    1/87
    HO
    20mm
    1"=7'-3"

    1/76
    OO (British)
    -
    1"=6'=4"

    1/72
    -
    25mm
    1"=6'

    1/64
    S
    28mm
    3/16"=1'

    1/50
    -
    -
    1"=4'-2"

    1/48
    O (US)
    -
    1/4"=1'

    1/43
    O (British)
    -
    1"=3'-7"

    1/35
    -
    50mm
    1"=2'-11"

    1/32
    #1
    54mm
    3/8"=1'

    1/25
    G*
    70mm
    1"=2'-1"

    1/24
    G*
    -
    1/2"=1'

    1/23
    G*
    76mm
    1"=1'-11"

    1/20
    -
    90mm
    1"=1'-8"

    1/18
    -
    100mm
    3/4"=1'

    1/16
    -
    -
    1"=1'-4"

    1/15
    -
    120mm
    1"=1'-3"

    1/12
    -
    150mm
    1"=1'

    1/8
    -
    -
    1"=8"

    1/6
    -
    -
    1"=6"
     
  3. iconscons

    iconscons Well-Known Member

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    Or you could just say that the 1/24 is a small amount larger. But no, you won't notice unless you put the same cars right next to eachother.
     
  4. Monkey-Hands

    Monkey-Hands Turntablist

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    Wow, that was quick! Thanks!!!

    I was asking this cause I want to re-shell an Alternator and I don´t know if I should go with 1:24 or 1:25 and if there´s even a difference in those 2.
     
  5. iconscons

    iconscons Well-Known Member

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    Although I've never finished a reshell on my own, I do know that a few millimeters can make a big difference. Heck, just depending on what shell you're putting on what base might screw it up. There only a 4% difference in lengths...but it's 4% in the wrong direction. Hope it works out.
     
  6. Kouri

    Kouri kupo

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    It also depends on the size of the vehicle. If you're using the same type of car, you'll want the same scale. However, larger vehicles may need a smaller scale to fit the bot. I remember seeing an Alt Megatron that used a 1:25 Hummer for its reshell.
     
  7. Hicks_Royel

    Hicks_Royel Chicks dig the Mutt!

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    That's the 1:25 project I was thinking about too. I think he used the Mustang frame to build the Hummer.

    Still if you're going for a reshell of a car, you're best to use a 1:24 scale vehicle.
     
  8. TTT

    TTT OutOfCommissionToys.com

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    Exactly - car 1/24 - Truck 1/25
     
  9. Monkey-Hands

    Monkey-Hands Turntablist

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    Thanks guys! :thumb 
     

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